Sunday, May 26, 2024

The Soldier

 


Lee R. Christensen's  Photos and Stories From Mt. Pleasant


Kathy:  Inspired by Rupert Brooke’s poem “The Soldier” and paraphrasing a line from it I’ve crafted this tribute.

     They never came Home but there is a spot in a Foreign Land that is forever North Sanpete.


Glen Brady

ID: 39835618
Entered the Service From: Utah
Rank: Staff Sergeant

Service: U.S. Army Air Forces, 527th Bomber Squadron, 379th Bomber Group, Heavy

Died: Monday, December 20, 1943
Buried at: Netherlands American Cemetery
Location: Margraten, Netherlands
Plot: M Row: 3 Grave: 6

Awards: Air Medal, Purple Heart


~~~~~~~~~~~~

Clyde W. Rigby                              

ID: O-743208
Entered the Service From: Utah
Rank: Second Lieutenant

Service: U.S. Army Air Forces, 577th Bomber Squadron, 392nd Bomber Group, Heavy

Died: Tuesday, January 04, 1944
Memorialized at: Cambridge American Cemetery
Location: Cambridge, England

Awards: Air Medal, Purple Heart


~~~~~~~~~~~~

Russell S. Jensen

ID: 39675224
Entered the Service From: Utah   
Rank: Private

Service: U.S. Army Air Forces, Headquarters Squadron, 5th Air Base Group

Died: Thursday, September 07, 1944
Memorialized at: Manila American Cemetery
Location: Fort Bonifacio, Manila, Philippines

Awards: Purple Heart

From Moroni




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Charles Rutishauser


ID: 39835671
Entered the Service From: Utah
Rank: Technical Sergeant

Service: U.S. Army Air Forces, 526th Bomber Squadron, 379th Bomber Group, Heavy

Died: Sunday, June 18, 1944
Buried at: Ardennes American Cemetery
Location: Neupre (Neuville-en-Condroz), Belgium
Plot: D Row: 16 Grave: 4

Awards: Air Medal with 2 Oak Leaf Clusters, Purple Heart



~~~~~~~~~~~~



Wallace W. Candland

ID: 39918059
Entered the Service From: Utah
Rank: Corporal

Service: U.S. Army Air Forces, Army Air Corps

Died: Thursday, January 04, 1945
Memorialized at: East Coast Memorial
Location: New York, NY, USA




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Dee A. Johnson

ID: O-730509
Entered the Service From: Utah
Rank: First Lieutenant

Service: U.S. Army Air Forces, 94th Fighter Squadron, 1st Fighter Group

Died: Sunday, July 11, 1943
Memorialized at: Sicily-Rome American Cemetery
Location: Nettuno, Italy

Awards: Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with 6 Oak Leaf Clusters, Purple Heart

Wasatch Academy




~~~~~~~~~~~~~




James K. Sorensen

ID: 03684611
Entered the Service From: Utah
Rank: Ship's Cook, Third Class

Service: U.S. Navy, United States Navy

Died: Friday, December 11, 1942
Memorialized at: Manila American Cemetery
Location: Fort Bonifacio, Manila, Philippines

Awards: Purple Heart




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


Harold Q. Graham


ID: 39914895
Entered the Service From: Utah
Rank: Private First Class

Service: U.S. Army, 275th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Division

Died: Saturday, May 12, 1945
Buried at: Netherlands American Cemetery
Location: Margraten, Netherlands
Plot: K Row: 17 Grave: 3



~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ferris Ivory

ID: 06604538
Entered the Service From: Utah
Rank: Aviation Radioman, Second Class

Service: U.S. Navy, United States Naval Reserve

Died: Saturday, February 23, 1946
Memorialized at: Honolulu Memorial
Location: Honolulu, HI, USA

Awards: Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with 4 Gold Stars

Wasatch Academy



The Soldier
If I should die, think only this of me:
That there's some corner of a foreign field
That is for ever England. There shall be
In that rich earth a richer dust concealed;
A dust whom England bore, shaped, made aware,
Gave, once, her flowers to love, her ways to roam,
A body of England's, breathing English air,
Washed by the rivers, blest by suns of home.


And think, this heart, all evil shed away,

A pulse in the eternal mind, no less

Gives somewhere back the thoughts by England given;

Her sights and sounds; dreams happy as her day;
And laughter, learnt of friends; and gentleness,
In hearts at peace, under an English heaven.

Thursday, May 23, 2024

History of Chiropractic In Utah

 

Dr. Benjamin R. Johnson, C. B. Johnson and Frank F. Pyott practiced in Mt. Pleasant and Sanpete County



The history of chiropractic in Utah  is closely related with legal procedure.  As soon as the first chiropractors came to the state and commenced the practice of their profession, they received letters stating the following, "Dear Doctor, You are hereby notified to cease Chiropractic Adjustments or treatments until you have complied with the law." Signed by R. W. Fisher, Secretary, Board of Medical Examiners of the State of Utah, Salt Lake City, September 16, 1908.

Some of the chiropractors, after receiving such a letter, rather than be placed in an unfavorable light before the public and made to fight the case in the courts, decided to leave the state and let the rough pioneering fall on other practitioners.  There were many, however, who took but little or no notice of these letters and continued their practices. 

In 1915 Benjamin R. Johnson, C. B. Johnson and Frank F. Pyott began their chiropractic services in Sanpete County and built up successful practices in Mount Pleasant, Ephraim, and Manti.  In September of 1915 they were arrested.  Their trials terminated unsuccessfully in September of 1916, with a sentene of $100. or 100 days in jail.  Doctor Pyott paid his fine and Doctor Johnson decided rather than pay a fine he preferred to go to jail.  He commenced serving his sentence on September 26, 1916, in the Sanpete County jail at Manti. His friends were highly wrought up over this affair and practically every taxpayer in the county signed a petition to the board of pardons asking for his release.  The Mount Pleasant Pyramid published on December 2, 1916 

 "CITIZENS DEMAND RELEASE OF CHIROPRACTOR" 
 "About fifty of Dr. B. R. Johnson's patients from nearly every town in Sanpete County called at the County Courthouse in Manti, Wednesday, November 29th and unknown to him, paid the unexpired portion of his fine in pennies, obtained his release and stormed his cell.  The release was presented to Doctor Johnson by little Arba Sanders of Fairview, upon whose case he was convicted of  'practicing medicine' some two months ago.  Doctor Johnson received a pardon by the State Board of Pardons recently conditioned upon his refraining from giving his services to the public until he secured a medical license.  This condition was impossible to comply with because the state medical examiners refuse to consider his application for a license because he is not a graduate of a medical college.  The medical examiners do not recognize a chiropractic college, of which Doctor Johnson is a graduate.  Therefore he refused to accept the pardon because his duty to the sick would not permit it.  Doctor Johnson's friends and patients were not satisfied with the action of the board of pardons, so they decided to take matters in their own hands with the result of Doctor Johnson was released and spent Thanksgiving with his wife and family in Mount Pleasant."

It can be said to the credit of the chiropractic profession in Utah that its upholders are men and women of integrity, ability and devotion to duty.  They are a people who will sacrifice much for the principle and rather than flee from the state to safety they prefer to be classed as lawbreakers, subject to arrest, criminal prosecution, fine and imprisonment, for the high regard for duty which they feel they owe the people of this state.

Practically every reputable chiropractor in the state has been subjected to one or two arrests, and some of them have had false serious charges preferred against them which have had a tendency to cast reflection on their ability, integrity and patriotism, but notwithstanding this they are still giving their services to the public.  They maintain that it is far better to jeopardize their personal welfare in serving the people of this state than to elect a path of least resistance by going to a state where the science of chiropractic has legal recognition and regulation.

To remedy the controversies in the courts, each legislative session since 1911 has been asked by those interested in chiropractic to give adequate consideration to this matter.  At first the request was practically ignored, but in later sessions the legislators were so flooded with requests from the people by petitions and personal letters to regulate the science of chiropractic that much support was given the subject by the legislators.  A bill to regulate chiropractic and drugless healing was introduced in the senate of the 1913 session and passed with but two opposing votes.  This bill was sifted out by the house sifting committee.  In 1915 there was introduced into the house a bill to recognize chiropractic.  This bill passed with only one vote against it.  The senate adjourned before a vote was taken on the measure.  In each of these sessions a great deal  of opposition from medical sources was manifest and the legislators were at a loss to know just what to do.  But, apparently, the fact that medical ideas have been given credence for so long led them to believe that such opposition could not be mistaken and therefore the chiropractic position must be wrong. 

The 1917 session was characterized by a stormy fight in the house of representatives, the chiropractic bill losing by a vote of twenty to twenty three.  The session of 1919 was even more stormy.  The chiropractic measure was introduced early in the house of representatives and it was fought strenuously at every angle, but finally passed with but a few votes in opposition.  The opponents of the measure, realizing that an overwhelming majority of the legislators were in favor of chiropractic, resorted to new tactics.  It consisted in assuming a willingness to have chiropractic regulated, but insisted that the science and practitioners of chiropractic be placed under the control of the regular medical board.  This appealed to many senators as being the proper solution of the problem, consequently a bill which had been introduced by the medical interests passed.  The chiropractic bill was laid on the table in the senate and was never recalled, although several ineffectual attempts were made to resurrect it.  The medical substitute bill was killed in the house by a big majority.  At this writing the law stands as it was eight years ago. (1919)

The chiropractors of the state have organized themselves into state and county organizations and through this means have been able to protect and conserve the interests of chiropractic and chiropractors.  The officeship of the Utah Chiropractors Association for 1919 is:  N. L. Cottam, president; Mrs F. M. Colson, vice presicent; Frank F.Pyott, secretary treasurer; and M. G. Hansen and J. M. Grant, directors.  The Salt Lake County Chiropractors Association is presided over by W. H. Pyot, B. R. Johnson, vice president, and P. E. Erickson, secretary-treasurer.  Through these organizations the services of chiropractors have been offered free of charge to the city, state and national government during the progress of the war.  It is with regret by the chiropractors that such offers were not accepted.  As the the final triumph of the science of the chiropractic in Utah, no member of the profession will be a theme for eulogy by the coming generations. 

(taken from "UTAH SINCE STATEHOOD 1919,  Volume I, pages 715-720





The above newspaper article  and advertisement were found by Judy Malkiewicz.  Thankyou Judy

+  

Wednesday, May 22, 2024

HEAP BIG WATERS,

 

June 18, 1918, during W. D. Candland's term as mayor, Mt. Pleasant was visited by a number of floods, one being the biggest in the history of the city. Great boulders and rocks were carried with the stream of mud, damaging bridges and fences, sweeping down the streets and through city lots, covering gardens and filling basements, and completely filling the channels with debris, rocks, etc. One life was lost, that of Louis Oldham, who, near his home east of the city, slipped and fell into the stream. Some days later, his body was found in the debris west of the city. A few days after the flood, a group of convicts were sent from the state penitentiary to assist in clearing out Pleasant Creek channel. Many local men volunteered their assistance. p 200 "History of Mt. Pleasant" by Hilda Madsen Longsdorf








Monday, May 20, 2024

Auroras and Earthquakes: Strange Companions

 

WIKI COMMONS 

 

It turns out that an Aurora Borealis was seen the same year that our pioneer 
ancestors settled in Mt. Pleasant.  It goes down in history as "The Carrington Event".
 
The Following comes From Wikipedia :
The Carrington Event was the most intense geomagnetic storm in recorded history, peaking from 1 to 2 September 1859 during solar cycle 10. It created strong auroral displays that were reported globally[1] and caused sparking and even fires in multiple telegraph stations. The geomagnetic storm was most likely the result of a coronal mass ejection (CME) from the Sun colliding with Earth's magnetosphere.[2]

The geomagnetic storm was associated with a very bright solar flare on 1 September 1859. It was observed and recorded independently by British astronomers Richard Christopher Carrington and Richard Hodgson—the first records of a solar flare.

A geomagnetic storm of this magnitude occurring today would cause widespread electrical disruptions, blackouts, and damage due to extended outages of the electrical power grid.[3][4][5]


Of particular interest is the display of aurora borealis along the top of the mountains.    







[Deseret Evening News; November 18, 1901]
AT MT. PLEASANT
There Were Two Perceptible Shocks But No Damage

Mt. Pleasant, Nov. 14--This city was given a severe jolting last evening by the earthquake. No damage was done, but many citizens were badly scared as it is the first one to visit this section in many years. The tremor lasted fully ten seconds and was so severe that upper stories of buildings rocked and swayed very perceptibly. About ten minutes after the first shock a second one of a more lengthy, shivering nature, passed over the town, lasting for about twenty seconds. There was no distinct shock to this one, but the trembling was very plainly felt.



ELECTRICAL DISPLAY IN SANPETE
Weather Director L. H. Murdoch Tells Of Phenomena Witnessed During The Recent Earthquake In Southern Utah--
Rocks On Mountains Shattered By Electricity Or Seismic Disturbance


Weather Director L. H. Murdoch of the local weather office returned Saturday afternoon, from his trip to Manti where he inspected the local voluntary observation station. He brought back with him news of features connected with the late earthquake in Piute and Sevier counties, particularly, which are highly sensational and out of the usual run of seismic disturbances in this section. Mr. Murdoch learned that during the occurrence of the earthquake, there were electrical displays all along the ridges and crests of the mountains, in the shape of flashes of light suggestive of aurora borealis displays, the phenomenon continuing while the terrestrial disturbances were in operation. The electricity shot up into the air in great sheets, which though not very vivid, were bright enough to attract attention.
Moreover, Mr. Murdoch learned that rocks along the tops of the ridges and crests of the mountains had been not only dislodged, but torn and shattered either by the force of the earthquake, or by electricity, or both. He found the people of Sanpete, Sevier and Piute counties still very much frightened over the recent occurrence and scarcely knowing what was to come next.
[Deseret Evening News; November 18, 1901]


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

EPHRAIM VISITED
Tremors Made Bottle Dance and Terrified Citizens

Ephraim, Nov. 14--A very severe earthquake shock was felt in this city last night. The shock commenced at just 9:40, and lasted about thirty seconds, but some of the scared citizens thought it lasted that many minutes. At H. P. Larsen's drug store and at the saloons it made the bottles on the shelves dance a jig. People in the drug store were afraid the house was coming down and ran for the street for safety. No damage resulted from the shock.
_____________________________________________________________________________________
POKER PLAYERS PRAYED
Earthquake In Southern Utah Scared Them
Threw Hands Into the Deck and Sent Up Earnest Supplication--Then Resumed the Game


James Long, superintendent of the June Bug group of mining properties in the Gold mountain country, is in Salt Lake. Mr. Long was at Kimberley a few days ago when the earthquake occurred. "That was the real center of the disturbance," said he yesterday, and it was no laughing matter, either. The first and severest shock was at 9:30 in the evening, and there were a number of smaller ones during the night. It was a regular upheaval, and had the houses been of brick they could not have stood. I was playing hearts with two others in the back room of a saloon at the time. The game was adjourned and we all ran out. I admit I ran, and I ran hard. I would have run farther, but I did not know where to run to. I am told on good authority that four men were engaged in a poker game at the time at Monroe, and that the meeting was at once resolved into the most enthusiastic prayer meeting ever held in southern Utah. Later they resumed the game."
[Salt Lake Tribune; November 18, 1901]


To read all accounts:
http://www.seis.utah.edu/lqthreat/nehrp_htm/1901sout/n1901so1.shtml#rs
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

EARTHQUAKE LIGHTS  explained in Wikipedia

The lights are reported to appear while an earthquake is occurring, although there are reports of lights before or after earthquakes, such as reports concerning the 1975 Kalapana earthquake.[5] They are reported to have shapes similar to those of the auroras, with a white to bluish hue, but occasionally they have been reported having a wider color spectrum. The luminosity is reported to be visible for several seconds, but has also been reported to last for tens of minutes. Accounts of viewable distance from the epicenter varies: in the 1930 Idu earthquake, lights were reported up to 70 miles (110 km) from the epicenter.[6] Earthquake lights were reportedly spotted in Tianshui, Gansu, approximately 400 kilometres (250 mi) north-northeast of the 2008 Sichuan earthquake's epicenter.[7]
During the 2003 Colima earthquake in Mexico, colorful lights were seen in the skies for the duration of the earthquake.[citation needed] During the 2007 Peru earthquake lights were seen in the skies above the sea and filmed by many people.[8] The phenomenon was also observed and caught on film during the 2009 L'Aquila[9][10] and the 2010 Chile earthquakes.[11] Video footage has also recorded this happening during the 9 April 2011 eruption of Sakurajima Volcano, Japan[citation needed]. The phenomenon was also reported around the Amuri Earthquake in New Zealand, that occurred 1 September 1888. The lights were visible in the morning of 1 September in Reefton, and again on 8 September.[12]
More recent appearances of the phenomenon, along with video footage of the incidents, happened in Sonoma County of California on August 24, 2014,[13] and in Wellington New Zealand on November 14, 2016 where blue flashes like lightning were seen in the night sky, and recorded on several videos.[14] In September 8, 2017, many people reported such sightings in Mexico City after a 8.2 magnitude earthquake with epicenter 460 miles (740 km) away, near Pijijiapan in the state of Chiapas.[15]
Appearances of the earthquake light seem to occur when the quakes have a high magnitude, generally 5 or higher on the Richter scale.[13] There have also been incidents of yellow, ball-shaped lights appearing before earthquakes.[16]

Types[edit]

Earthquake lights may be classified into two different groups based on their time of appearance: (1) preseismic EQL, which generally occur a few seconds to up to a few weeks prior to an earthquake, and are generally observed closer to the epicenter and (2) coseismic EQL, which can occur either near the epicenter (“earthquake‐induced stress”), or at significant distances away from the epicenter during the passage of the seismic wavetrain, in particular during the passage of S waves (“wave‐induced stress”).[17]
EQL during the lower magnitude aftershock series seem to be rare.[17]
Simplified model of phole propagation within an interplate, orogenic tectonic setting in a subduction zone environment (i.e., Andean‐type). The vertical scale (topographic relief) is exaggerated for clarity. +, positive holes; e′, electrons.[17]

Possible Explanations[edit]

Research into earthquake lights is ongoing; as such, several mechanisms have been proposed. Positive Holes is one such model.[1]
Some models suggest the generation of EQLs involve the ionization of oxygen to oxygen anions by breaking of peroxy bonds in some types of rocks (dolomite, rhyolite, etc.) by the high stress before and during an earthquake.[17] After the ionisation, the ions travel up through the cracks in the rocks. Once they reach the atmosphere these ions can ionise pockets of air, forming plasma that emits light.[18] Lab experiments have validated that some rocks do ionise the oxygen in them when subjected to high stress levels. Research suggests that the angle of the fault is related to the likelihood of earthquake light generation, with subvertical (nearly vertical) faults in rifting environments having the most incidences of earthquake lights.[19]
One hypothesis involves intense electric fields created piezoelectrically by tectonic movements of rocks containing quartz.[20]
Another possible explanation is local disruption of the Earth's magnetic field and/or ionosphere in the region of tectonic stress, resulting in the observed glow effects either from ionospheric radiative recombination at lower altitudes and greater atmospheric pressure or as aurora. However, the effect is clearly not pronounced or notably observed at all earthquake events and is yet to be directly experimentally verified.[21]
During the American Physical Society's 2014 March meeting, research was provided that gave a possible explanation for the reason why bright lights sometimes appear during an earthquake. The research stated that when two layers of the same material rub against each other, voltage is generated. The researcher, Professor Troy Shinbrot of Rutgers University, conducted lab experiments with different types of grains to mimic the crust of the earth and emulated the occurrence of earthquakes. "When the grains split open, they measured a positive voltage spike, and when the split closed, a negative spike." The crack allows the voltage to discharge into the air which then electrifies the air and creates a bright electrical light when it does so. According to the research provided, they have produced these voltage spikes every single time with every material tested. While the reason for such an occurrence was not provided, Professor Troy Shinbrot referenced the light to a phenomenon called triboluminescence. Researchers hope that by getting to the bottom of this phenomenon, it will provide more information that will allow seismologists to better predict earthquakes.[22][23][24]


Sunday, May 19, 2024

HAMILTON 5TH GRADE 1957-1958


 




L to R:
Top row
Sammy Madsen, Juanita Hill, David Strop, Anita Simons, Ron Jackson, Jerry Lee Sorensen, David Lee Unopolus 

Second row: 
Paul Squire,  Shauna Willcox, John Ross Seely, Alice Lynn Christensen, Vernadine Daniels, Richard Brotherson, Barbara Kay Stansfield, Tom Larsen

Third row
Linda Zabriskie, Marsden Allred, Ernest Brunger, Georgia Norman

Fourth row
Chris Madsen, Glenadene Daniels, Tyler Tuttle, Kathrene Rigby, Dennis Cloward, Michael Porter, Pearl Johnson, Bruce Larsen, Linda Mary Christensen, David Ream

Fifth row
Patricia Shelley, Alan Syndergaard, Ted Poulsen, Jennie Lynn Swensen, Dennis Terry, Gail Hansen, Chris Swensen, Larry Staker, Lena Marie Carr. 

Sixth row
Kathryn Shelley, Rex Christensen, Marilyn Shepherd, Paul Lund, Shirlene Allred, Arthur Candland, Sandra Seely

Saturday, May 18, 2024

RIGBY PHOTOS




These are photos taken by my father, Wm. Neldon Rigby.  He had an old Brownie Camera.  It really did take some good pictures in its day.  Unfortunately, it
didn't add a caption.  If you can identify anyone in these photos, please let me know.  My father grew up in Oak Creek, Fairview, Milburn.  






 

Friday, May 17, 2024

Jacob and Ingaborg Christensen

 


Jacob and Ingaborg Christensen 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF JACOB CHRISTENSEN AND FAMILY Copied by Karen Shelley Hacking Great Grandfather of Norman Shelley Jacob Christensen, son of Christen Petersen and Maren Thompsen, eldest of ten children, was born in Vennsyssel, Hjoring, Denmark, September 21, 1827. His father was the son of Peter Peterson and Mette Christensen. His father, Christen Peterson was born in Lendum, Jutland, Denmark and his mother Maren Thomsen was born in Hapstyert, Jutland Denmark. His boyhood days were typical of the times in which he lived. His parents earned their scanty living by fishing. Many times later in his life he told his children of the following incident that took place when he was a mere boy. He was employed by a certain woman to herd her cows. A part of his wages was to be his lunch. The woman, was not of a very generous nature and one night Jacob said to her, "My eyes must be getting very poor.” she replied, "Oh, how’s that my boy?" "Because", he said "I could hardly see any cheese on my bread today." When a young man he spent two years in the service of his king, as was customary. He served as a sailor and one day was ordered to climb up and repair the mast and while so doing he lost his balance and plunged headlong into the ocean. He was almost drowned, having gone down for the third time when he was rescued. Many times later in life he related this experience and said that drowning would be a most peaceful death. Jacob joined the L. D. S. church in his native land on Feb. 20, 1853 and was a traveling elder for the following two years. He married Inger Kristine Thomsen Jan. 19, 1855. She became the mother of nine children, the eldest being born in Denmark before immigration.
In 1857 they immigrated to the United States. A perpetual emigration fund came into being through the desires of the Church leaders to bring to this land those too poor to provide themselves with the transportation money which was needed. The provision of this act says: "Where as there are many good and worthy people who would gladly emigrate to this state if they were provided with the means." This fund provided money for the emigrant, who paid it back just as soon as he could, after getting settled in Zion.
 Jacob’s mother accompanied them to Omaha, Nebraska, where she died a short time later. They were compelled to stay here for two years, because of lack of funds to go further. Here, although he took whatever employment he could get at sawmills and adobe yards, they lived under the most trying circumstances. One time he was obliged to trade one shirt, of his meager supply of two, for a bushel of frozen turnips, which they boiled and then warmed up in tallow.
In the meantime his wife’s parents, Thomas C. and Else M. Olsen Jensen had disposed of their property in Denmark preparatory to immigrating to Utah. They joined Jacob and his wife at Omaha and then crossed the plains together with the Nesling Company. While crossing the plains Jacob and his good wife encountered a great misfortune. `Their only child died. The company halted and buried the little one by the wayside. Jacob, overcome with grief, threw himself across the newly made grave, declaring he could not go on and leave it. Grasping hold of him, his wife said, "Jacob, you’re not a child are you? This will not do, me must go on."
They located in Mt. Pleasant, and were among the first settlers in the fall of 1859, living in a dugout until the fort was build. Jacob helped to build the south wall of the fort, furnishing team, wagon and his own work. Homes were built against the inside walls of the fort where the settlers lived. By the fall of 1859 Mt. Pleasant had a population of 800 people.
The first ward was organized at Mt. Pleasant, July 9, 1859, by Elders George A. Smith and Amasa M. Lyman. William S. Seely was ordained bishop. Jacob Christensen became his first counselor. The Bishop and his counselors were looked upon as the leaders of the group. They were the superintendents, planners, confidant tribunal, directors, ecclesiastical tribunal, the leaders of the group, in fact the responsibility of the settlement rested upon their shoulders. They were all busy people those days, building homes, a fort, clearing and plowing land, planting crops, building fences, canals, fighting and guarding against Indians, harvesting crops, and a score of other jobs.
Thereafter, he devoted much of his time to the building up of this community. He was a shareholder in Mt. Pleasant’s first cooperative institution and organizer of the United Order here. He served as Counselor to Bishop William S. Seely for seven years and as president of the High Priest’s quorum for twenty—five years. January 14, 1865, he married Ingeborg Anderson, daughter of Christian and Karen Anderson. Ingeborg was the only daughter and the youngest of a family of four, born in Seiland, Denmark, April 28, 1846. Her father was a tailor, and Ingeborg had a comfortable childhood, attending the schools of the town until her parents accepted the Latter-day Saint Church and decided to leave their homeland for Utah, where her three brothers had already settled. This was in 1862. She spent her sixteenth birthday aboard a sailing vessel, crossing the Atlantic Ocean. The trip across the ocean was so miserable, it stood out in her memory as forty—six days of misery.
After landing in New York and crossing the plains by ox team, furnished. by' the church, she landed in Salt. Lake City. Her brothers met her and her parents here. She was offered a job in Salt Lake City by a family named Deckers. This seemed a blessing from heaven to her; now she could have a job to earn some money to help get some of those things so much needed by herself and her family. After some months there, she started working for one of Brigham Young’s wives where she stayed for some time. After a year in Salt Lake, Ingeborg went to Mt. Pleasant to be with her folks. This young girl of 18 obtained work in the home of Jacob Christensen whose wife had a family of youngsters, and in that day with the lack of any comforts, a family gave the mother plenty work to do.
Plurality of wives was in flower at that time. Those who could afford two families and were worthy could get permission of the Church authorities to marry a second wife. Jacob asked Ingeborg to marry him, and after due consideration she accepted his offer of marriage. They were married January, 1865. She was 19 years of age and he was double her age, but it seems at that time, this was often the case. Jacob Christensen and Ingeborg Anderson were sealed 14 Jan 1865. He was sealed to Inger Kirstine Jensen 4 Oct 1862 and he was sealed to Anna Christena Magnussen (Marberg) on 15 Mar 1869. Ingeborg became the mother of seven children, two dying in infancy.
About this time Jacob took a very active part in the Black Hawk War, being captain of Company A, Mt. Pleasant Militia and was in several engagements with the Indians. He was also a Councilman in Mt. Pleasant’s first City Council. On March 15, 1869, he married his third wife, Anna Christena Marberg, daughter of Johannes and Christine Peterson Marberg, who was born March 2, 1850 at Leitse, Gutland, Sweden. She was the second child in a family of four daughters.
Even during Anna’s early childhood tragedy and hardship stalked through her life. Her family was desperately poor, as were most of the people in the locality in which they lived. That part of Sweden was barren and unproductive. The climate was cold and the people were entirely dependent upon the rainfall for their crops. Food and fuel were scarce, coal being unheard of and wood had to be bought.  . Ann’s father was a tailor, of the machine less age, doing all his sewing by hand and, at times, walking miles and spending days to sew at the homes of the more well—to—do. His wife assisted him in his work and a good part of her time she worked for others, sometimes in a slaughter house, taking her pay in meat to help out the family larder. Anna began her working career at the age of nine, tending children.
Johannes Marberg was a very devout man. He and his family were members of the Swedish Lutherian Church, the prevailing religion. During Anna’s early childhood her parents were converted to the L.D.S. church by a Mormon missionary named Warnick of Battle Creek, Utah, now known as Pleasant Grove, Utah. Elder Warnick not only brought the Marbergs their religion, but he gave them a beautiful friendship and instilled in their hearts the desire to immigrate to Utah. Anna was baptized and confirmed a member of the church, by her father, when she was ten years old.
In the fall of 1863, when Anna was just thirteen years old, her father contracted typhoid fever and died, leaving her mother destitute and with a family to provide for. Christine Marberg having no means of maintaining the home, was forced to sell her small house and household goods at public auction and find a home for herself and daughters. The eldest daughter, Marie Helena, 15, and Anna were taken in by families to help care for children. The third child, Augusta, age 5 was taken by a moderately wealthy L.D.S. family. The mother with her infant daughter, Hedda, secured a place to work for a family named Collgren.
During this time of misfortune Elder Warnick had proved a staunch friend of the Marberg family. In the spring of 1864, he received an honorable release from his mission and the money for his fare home. Knowing Christine Marberg’s great desire to go to Zion, Adolph Warnick stayed in Sweden and loaned Christine his fare to Utah.
On account of her limited finances Mrs. Marberg was unable to take her three eldest daughters with her when she immigrated. The child, Augusta was still with the family who had taken her at the time of her father’s death and who had become greatly attached to her. Friends rallied around Mrs. Marberg, promising to care for Anna and Marie Helena. The day came when the mother was to depart for• America and.`Utah, a day• to the end of days never to be forgotten by Anna. Her mother and baby sister, in company with the Collgrens and another family of converts had packed their belongings in white topped wagons which were to convey them to the nearest railroad center. The country was perfectly flat and level and Anna and Marie Helena watched and waved to their mother until the wagons became a mere speck in the distance. It was two sad and lonely little girls, just 14 and 16, who turned back to the mercy and charity of friends and relatives. Marie Helena went to her maternal grandparents, Peer and Helena Peterson, who were devoted to the girl, but bitter toward her mother for joining the L.D.S. faith. Anna was to stay with an aged couple and their widowed daughter.
Because of the gap between age and youth, life with the old couple became intolerable to Anna. She sought the advice and council of her sister and it was decided that Anna should leave this place and go to her father’s sister, Marie, who worked in a neighboring rural community. So Anna and Marie Helena walked the four Swedish miles, equivalent to sixteen American miles, to the place where the Aunt worked as a cook for a group of laborers. Marie Helena rested here for a couple of days and walked back alone to west Gutland.
How Anna hated to see her go, it was well the girls could not read the future for they never saw one another again. Marie Helena, never a robust child, was taken seriously ill shortly after this and was taken to a hospital in a distant city and died and was buried there. Anna knew nothing of this until she received word from the Grandmother, through the Aunt, that her sister was dead and she could call at the Grandparents and get the few possessions the girl left, if she desired. Even the mother, on her journey across the ocean, was not free from the tragedy that seemed to follow the Marbergs. The baby Hedda, now one and a half years old, contracted the measles and died during the early part of the night. The mother, dreading to have her child thrown overboard, lay with the dead baby in her arms until morning. Then she reported it’s death to the ship’s authorities and the little one was buried in the ocean.
In the meantime the family who had taken Augusta, immigrated to America, taking this child with them. While crossing the plains the entire family, including the child, died of cholera. Only the hired man, who immigrated with them, lived to carry the story of Augusta’s death to her mother.
Anna, now alone in Sweden, was again faced with the problem of finding a home. It was no longer possible for her Aunt to keep her at the place she worked. Anna was a pretty, red haired girl and the men would not keep their hands off her. Although Anna was now old enough to hire out, she lacked the required education to do so. There were no schools in the rural areas of Sweden, so Anna never attended a day of school in her life. It was the custom, however, for one to be able to read and repeat to a priest portions of the Swedish Testament and the Catechism. When they passed this test they were fairly well educated and ready to begin work. Anna studied diligently and in time mastered these books. She secured a place to do housework, with the customary understanding that she must remain six months and she was given one dollar in advance to bind the bargain.
She was about to begin her second year at this place when she received word from Elder Warnick, who was still in Sweden, that he had a letter from her mother repaying the loan he made to her and telling him she was borrowing the money to bring Anna to Utah. Elder Warnick advised Anna not to begin another six months of service, but she had no other place to stay until her money came so she was obliged to start a third six months term.
Again Adolph Warnick proved to be the rare friend he was. When Anna’s fare arrived he found a girl to take her place, brought the girl to his household and took Anna back to West Gutland, where she stayed awhile with Adolph’s sweetheart’s parents and then later in the spring he took her to Jutaborg where she began the first lap of her journey to America. From here she crossed the north sea to Liverpool, England. At Liverpool she boarded a sailboat and spent five weeks on the Atlantic Ocean. This company was to have had the first steamship to cross the ocean, but were disappointed and so made the last sailboat trip over the Atlantic.
Anna arrived in New York City in July of 1868 and came by railroad to Omaha, Nebraska. She then joined the Folkman and the C. C. A. Christensen companies and. began a four weeks trek across the plains, walking all the way. It was the middle of August when she joined her mother, who had come to Salt Lake City, from Mt. Pleasant to meet her after a four year separation. It was a happy meeting between mother and daughter. They were the only survivors of a family of six. They never again parted until the mother's death in the spring of 1907. On March 15, 1869 at the age of nineteen, Anna was married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City, to Jacob Christensen of Mt. Pleasant, Utah, 23 years her senior. Her first home was the old Haage home on South State Street, now owned by Maxine Johansen Hardy. This house, built by Jacob Christensen was considered one of the finest residences of the early days. Jacob Christensen died March 9, 1915, having been an invalid for eleven years.
Anna became the mother of ten children, three dying in infancy, one in youth and two in middle life. She was the wife of a soldier and the mother of a soldier. She was a faithful church worker, being a visiting teacher for over forty years when the teacher’s beat covered miles instead of blocks and the contributions consisted of the staples, such as flour, eggs, meat, etc.
Anna died May 7, 1937 at the age of 87 years, two months and five days. She left four children, fifteen grandchildren and ten great- grandchildren. Her once red hair was grey, but her back that carried so many burdens was still unbent and her spirit still unbroken and surely, the good Lord, who holds the destinies of men in the hollow of His hand, will have a special reward for souls like these, who have kept the faith. This history was written by Olea Thompson, granddaughter of Jacob and Anna Marberg Christensen.   

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The following is a history from our archives and published in 2012
























Jacob Christensen, son of Christen Petersen and Maren Thompsen, eldest of ten children, was born in Vennsyssel, Hjoring, Denmark, September 21, 1827. His father was the son of Peter Peterson and Mette Christensen. His father, Christen Peterson was born in Lendum, Jutland, Denmark and his mother Maren Thomsen was born in Napstyert, Jutland Denmark.



His boyhood days were typical of the times in which he lived. His parents earned their scanty living by fishing. When a young man he spent two years in the service of his king, as was customary. He served as a sailor.


Jacob joined the L.D.S. church in his native land on February 20, 1853 and was a traveling elder for the following two years. He married Inger Kristine Thomsen January 19, 1855. She became the mother of nine children, the eldest being born in Denmark before immigration.



In 1857 they immigrated to the United States. a perpetual emigration fund came into being through the desires of the church leaders to bring to this land those too poor to provide themselves with the transportation money which was needed.


Jacob's mother accompanied them to Omaha, Nebraska, where she died a short time later. They were compelled to stay here for two years, because of lack of funds to go further. Here, although he took whatever employment he could get at sawmills and adobe yards, they lived under the most trying circumstances. One time he was obliged to trade one shirt, of his meager supply of two, for a bushel of frozen turnips, which they boiled and then warmed up in tallow. While crossing the plains Jacob and his good wife encountered a great misfortune. Their only child died.



They located in Mt. Pleasant, among the first settlers in the fall of 1859, living in a dugout until the fort was built. Jacob helped to build the south wall of the fort, furnishing team, wagon and his own work. Homes were built against the inside walls of the fort where the settlers lived. By the fall of 1859 Mt. Pleasant had a population of 800 people.



Jacob Christensen Grave Marker


The First Ward was organized at Mt. Pleasant, July 9, 1859, by Elders George A. Smith and Amasa M. Lyman. William S. Seely was ordained bishop. Jacob Christensen became his first counselor. The Bishop and his counselors were looked upon as the leaders of the group. They were the superintendents, planners, confidant tribunal, directors, ecclesiastical tribunal, the leaders of the group, in fact the responsibility of the settlement rested upon their shoulders.


They were all busy people those days, building homes, a fort, clearing and plowing land, planting crops, building fences, canals, fighting and guarding against Indians, harvesting crops and a score of other jobs.


Thereafter, Jacob devoted much of his time to building up of this community. He was a shareholder in Mt. Pleasant's first cooperative institution and organizer of the United Order here. He served as Counselor to Bishop William S. Seely for seven years and as president of the High Priest's quorum for twenty five years.


January 14, 1865, he married Ingeborg Anderson, daughter of Christian and Karen Anderson. Ingeborg was the only daughter and the youngest of a family of four, born in Seiland, Denmark, April 28, 1846. Her father was a tailor, and Ingeborg had a comfortable childhood attending the schools of the town until her parents accepted the Latter-day Saint Church and decided to leave their homeland for Utah, where her three brothers had already settled. This was in 1862.


Plurality of wives was in flower at that time. Those who could afford two families and were worthy could get permission of the Church authorities to marry a second wife. Jacob asked Ingeborg to marry him, and after due consideration she accepted his offer of marriage. The were married, January 1865. She was 19 years of age and he was double her age, but it seems at that time, this was often the case. Ingeborg became the mother of seven children, two dying in infancy.


About this time Jacob took a very active part in the Black Hawk War, being captain of Company A, Mt. Pleasant Militia and was in several engagements with the Indians. He was also a Councilman in Mt. Pleasant's first city council.


On March 15, 1869, he married his third wife, Anna Christena Marberg, daughter of Johannes and Christine Peterson Marberg, who was born March 2, 1850 at Leitse, Gutland, Sweden. She was the second child in a family of four daughters.




They were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City. Their first home was the Haage home about 411 South State Street, Mt. Pleasant (now vacant). This house, built by Jacob Christensen was considered one of the finest residences of the early days.

Anna became the mother of ten children, three dying in infancy, one in youth and two in middle life.


Jacob died March 9, 1915, having been an invalid for eleven years.