Relic Home and Blacksmith Shop

Monday, December 31, 2012

Thunder Mug ~~~~ by Owen Sanders



This Bowl is not a cookie jar

Nor a porcelain pot for pickles;

But it is a thunder-mug
For Brisk nocturnal trickles!

This portable, versatile vessel
Artistic, or very plain
Was a blessing to the occupant
To ease the night-time strain.

It was easily clutched by a frantic hand
When the urgent call came ringing
And the muted vibrations
Could set the crock'ry singing.

On frosty nights, the chilling rim
Near shocked the sagging rear;
Thus, timid souls with dainty skin
Oft' viewed this pot with fear.

They perched in regal splendor
Upon this porcelain throne;
And endless thoughts were sifted
Of problems in the home.

For musical notes rang down the scale
From peals to thunderous rumbles;
And saved some sleepy footsteps
O'er trails beset with stumbles.


It changed the chore of midnight strolls

For half a lot or more;

And hazards of the winding trail
Beneath the glinting star.

Disposal was a dreary drudge
Where no one volunteered;
So mothers had the dismal chore
Ere morning sun appeared.

When tub and privy moved indoors
To occupy a closet,
The thunder-mug lay silent
And receive no more deposit.

Give us friends of yester-year
But not the sledge and axe;
Give us comforts that we love
But not a crushing tax.

Let us twang our heart strings
With one nostalgic tug;
But save us from the usage
Of the gleaming Thunder-Mug!

We often yearn for "The Good Old Days"
Before life's grand completion;
But the Thunder-Mug is one device
We'd ask for a firm deletion!!!

Thursday, December 27, 2012

Winona Zabriskie Passes Away


Winona Zabriskie

October 11, 1924 ~ December 19, 2012
Winona Zabriskie, 88, of Mount Pleasant, passed away on 19th day of December 2012 in Provo after a full and happy life.
Winona was born 11 October 1924 in Fairview; daughter of Henry Erastus and Alta Jane Pritchett Larsen. Winona married Don LeGrand Taylor (deceased) in 1941 and had three beloved children: Don Gordon Taylor (Sharon) Alpine, Winona Kathleen Harris (Joseph) American Fork, and Carol Jean Taylor (deceased). She divorced Don and married Gail Jay Zabriskie (deceased) in 1946. Winona and Gail have two children Jay Wynn Zabriskie (Natalie) Mt. Pleasant and Cindy Lee Hall (Marvin) Mt. Pleasant. 
Service and survival are the hallmarks of Winona’s life – she lost her husband Gail in 1991 after caring for him through his illness; became a breast cancer survivor in her late 70’s. Upon receiving a clean bill of health served an LDS Mission to Chicago Illinois where she also served in Jefferson City Missouri at the National Achieves. Returning home she spent more than a decade working in the Manti Temple. A life-long maker of quilts Winona’s quilt are loved all over the world she also devoted countless joyful hours working at the Mt. Pleasant North Stake Humanitarian effort..
A member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Winona has joined her family members who have gone before her; husband Gail after twenty-one years apart a joyful reunion is certain Precious daughter Carol Jean Taylor who left hours after she arrived; Grand-daughter Jenny dearest angel. Brother John Darryl Larsen and his sweet-heart Beth, sister Estella Tippitts her husbands Delbert and Heber, sister Thresa Brewer and her husband John. Brothers-in-law Morris Darwin Zabriskie (Darr), William Marlin Zabriskie (Bill), Duane Zabriskie , James Christensen, and Robert Bushell, Richard Nash; sister-in-law Lena Johnson Larsen. This family reunion will be full of joy, Yahtzee and Pinochle. Those not yet attending this heavenly family reunion are her children Gordon his wife Sharon, Kathleen her husband Joseph (Jay), Jay his wife Natalie, Cindy her husband Marvin, along with 16 Grandchildren ages 9-and up; 39.5 Great-Grandchildren, her brother Boyd Larsen and sister Alura Nash, brother in law Kay Zabriskie and his wife Erma, Sisters-in-law Carolyn Christensen Bushell and Marcella Zabriskie and many loved nieces, nephews, cousins and dear friends. After Winona’s initial reunion she continues her Lord’s work: bring warmth and joy to God’s children where he needs her.
Funeral services will be held Friday December 28, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. in the Mt. Pleasant North Stake Center. Viewings will be at the Rasmussen Mortuary in Mt. Pleasant on Thurs. December 27 from 6-8pm and 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. prior to services at the church. Interment at Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery.
Memorial contributions can be made at the Humanitarian Effort in your local area – take time and tie or quilt a blanket for others in honor of Winona and continue the warm gifts of kindness she so lovingly gave. Families are like old quilts – although they tend to unravel at times they can be stitched back together with love. We’ll miss our Grandma Nona!

TAKE THE TRAIN ALONG WITH ME ~ Submitted by Carol Corcoran

click the following:   http://www.openmyeyeslord.net/Train%20Ride.swf

Sunday, December 23, 2012

Peppermint Fudge ~ from Pinterest







Peppermint Oreo Fudge
Ingredients
  • 1 bag Milk Chocolate Hershey Kisses, unwrapped
  • 1 cup chocolate chips or chocolate candy melts (like Wilton or Almond Bark)
  • 1 bag Candy Cane Hershey Kisses, unwrapped
  • 1 cup white chocolate chips or white candy melts (like Wilton or Almond Bark)
  • 2 cups crushed Oreos
  • 2 - 14 oz. cans sweetened condensed milk
Instructions
  1. Prepare a 9x13 baking dish by lining it with parchment paper and spraying very lightly with non-stick cooking spray. Set aside.
  2. In a medium saucepan, combine the milk chocolate hershey kisses, chocolate chips or chocolate candy melts, and 1 can of sweetened condensed milk.
  3. Stir over LOW (no exceptions) heat until melted and smooth (the mixture should pull away slightly from the side of the saucepan). Fold 1 cup of the crushed Oreos into the chocolate mixture.
  4. Pour chocolate mixture into prepared 9x13 dish.
  5. Rinse out the sauce pan (if needed at all, sometimes I find it's totally clean simply from pouring it out!) and dry well.
  6. Add the Candy Cane Kisses, white chocolate chips or white candy melts, and 1 can of sweetened condensed milk to the saucepan.
  7. Stir over LOW heat until smooth and completely melted (the mixture should pull away slightly from the edges of the saucepan).
  8. Pour the white chocolate mixture over the chocolate oreo mixture, and spread evenly.
  9. Sprinkle the remaining Oreo crumbs over top and press into the fudge slightly.
  10. Let cool overnight (or at least 5 hours) to set. Cut into 1 inch cubes to serve.

Saturday, December 22, 2012

Mt. Pleasant's First Public Celebration of Christmas held at the First Presbyterian Church

1922





A memorable occasion associated with the old church is the first public celebration of Christmas, started by Dr. McMillan. In speaking of it, one of the pioneers says: "Here we saw the first Christmas tree laden with presents from eastern missionary barrels, and here the children saw the first oranges which they thought were yellow apples. They tried to eat them with the peel­ing on, and they threw them down when they found them bitter. It was then the teachers showed them how to peel their first oranges. The tree, illuminated with wax candles, created a pic­ture the like of which we had never seen before. It supplied the topic of conversation for many a day after, and so many modern customs were brought here through the medium of the church and school that have served both to entertain and instruct its patrons."

 page 251  Mt. Pleasant History by Hilda Madsen Longsdorf

Friday, December 21, 2012

Peter Azel Peel Descendants ~~~ Family Reunion

Back Row L to R:  Ralph Childs, Ross Childs (sons of Margaret and Lon Childs), Marc Smith (son of Lois and Eldon Smith), Tami Lowry and Tyler Tuttle (children of Barbara and Clair Tuttle). Monte Smith (son of Lois and Eldon Smith)

Front Row L to R:  Peter and Donald Hafen (sons of  Alice and Neil Hafen), Alice Peel Hafen, 
 Ted  Tuttle, Tom Tuttle (sons of Barbara and Clair Tuttle)   

Photo was taken in July of 1999

Thursday, December 20, 2012

Grandchildren of Andrew Madsen (Circa 1925) ~ submitted and restored by David R. Gunderson


Grandchildren of Andrew Madsen (Circa 1925)


            Alice, Johannah, Willis, Leoan, Bruce, Louise, Evelyn
              Annie, Antone 


Kathy:   The Antone Madsen pictured with other grandchildren of Andrew Madsen is Hamilton Grade school class of 1934.  He died Richland, Washington 4/20/09.  He left Utah early in WW2 to work on the atomic bomb project at Hanford ,Wa.  Ironically, he and Newel Nelson ,both class of ’34, lived across the street from each other during their growing up years and they died in the same week, Anton in Washington and Newel in Idaho. lee
~~~~~~~~~~~~


Granddaughters of Andrew Madsen (Circa 1925):
                  
        Alice, Johannah, Annie, Evelyn, Leoan, Louise




Photos taken at the home of A. C. Madsen

Tuesday, December 18, 2012

Major General Jesse Lee Reno 1823-1862 ~ written by Lee R. Christensen



Photo courtesy of wikipedia

Federal (USA)

Major General

Jesse Lee Reno


(1823 - 1862)
Home State: Pennsylvania
Command Billet: Army Corps Commander 
Branch of Service: Infantry 



Kathy: Posting fine.  My mother was a Parke.  We trace that line back to NW New Jersey to Micajah Parke.  General Reno’s maternal grandmother was Achsah Parke Quinby.  Achsah was Micajah’s sister. Their father was Joseph Parke a tavern owner and farmer in what is now Asbury, Warren county,, New Jersey.  The General and I have Joseph Parke (abt 1730-1815) in common -  his great  grandfather and my 5th great grandfather.  There is a great deal of info on the General on the  Net including photos  of him and monuments related to him.  I’ve visited South  Mountain where he died and his grave at Oak Hill Cemetery Washington D C.   My story on the General has been published by the Parke Society and now that you’ve prompted me to review his story I’ll post a reference to its publication to the General’s Wikipedia entry on the Net.  And I’ll try and write a paragraph or two on some other American history related to the General.   lee



Further reading: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jesse_L._Reno




 Major General Jesse Lee Reno
1823-1862
•••
Lee R. Christensen

“Up from the meadows rich with corn,
clear in the cool September morn,
The clustered spires of Frederick stand
Green-walled by the hills of Maryland.”

So begins Whittier’s Civil War poem, Barbara Frietchie. A Parke descendent, Major
General Jesse Lee Reno, IX Corp Commander, Army of the Potomac is intimately associated
with Barbara, her flag, and by extension, though not mentioned, the poem. The General’s
maternal grandmother was a Parke.

General Reno, on a September morn one week after the September morn of Whinier’s
poem, was in Frederick, Maryland. There, he met Barbara Frietchie.
After their meeting, perhaps after sipping tea or her homemade currant wine, he is reported
to have asked his brother, Colonel Benjamin Franklin Reno, “who does she put you
in mind of, Frank?” Frank replied, “Mother.” He might very well have said, “Grandmother
Achsah.”

Grandmother Achsah was Achsah Parke Quinby, native of Sussex (now Warren) County,
New Jersey. She was a Northwest New Jersey Parke.
The Parkes had been in New Jersey since 1682 when Roger Parke, a Quaker from Hexham,
Northumberland came to West Jersey to claim and settle on acreage he had purchased
while still in England. He is thought by most of us who descend from Northwest New
Jersey Parkes to be our immigrant ancestor. But the only line that has definitive documentation
of this relationship is John’s. Achsah is not known to be on John’s line.
Achsah’s father was Joseph Parke; her mother, Sarah. In all likelihood, Joseph’s father
was also a Joseph Parke; his mother, Margaret. The antecedents for Sarah and Margaret are
unknown. They are in fact so unknown that no one has ventured an educated guess.
Joseph Parke, Achsah’s father, was a tavern owner, blacksmith and farmer. His tavern
and smithy were a short walk up the hill from Musconetcong River. This section of Sussex
County had earlier been part of Hunterdon County, then Morris County and now Warren
County.


When Achsah was baptized on Christmas day 1768 with her two brothers, Micajah and
Charles and her sister Theodosia, the family was living in a very isolated and sparsely
settled section of New Jersey without a nearby church or village. The Reverend William
Frazer, Church of England, visited the area every third Sunday. On the Christmas Day he
baptized the four Parke children, he also baptized two other children from Mansfield Woodhouse
township. The Reverend found the area troublesome to serve; the Muskenetcunk (his
spelling) - after heavy rains-almost impassable. The residents “appear serious enough but
totally ignorant with regard to the prayers of the Church” he wrote. Services were held in
“barns and dwelling houses.” It is not recorded where the Parke children were baptized. I
would guess the icy Musconetcong.

Achsah married Samuel Quinby, a Revolutionary War veteran and a New Jersey native,
in 1784 or 1786. There is bureaucratic wrangling about the date in his pension file but
no primary evidence. Soon after the marriage, the couple moved to Washington County,
Pennsylvania where Samuel may have been living prior to their wedding. Living near them
in 1790 was her brother Micajah and his wife, the former Mary Beemer.
The Quinbys had twelve children, one of whom they named Rebecca, born in 1795,
Washington County. By 1810, the Quinbys were living in Mercer county, Pennsylvania,
Shenango Township. Living nearby was the Charles Reno family, whose oldest son, Lewis
Thomas Reno, would marry Rebecca Quinby.

Prior to 1820, Louis T. and Rebecca moved to what is now Wheeling, West Virginia,
where their third son, Jesse Lee Reno was born 20 June 1823. By 1840, the family was living
at French Creek Township, Venango County, Pennsylvania.
At age 18, still living in Venango County, Congressional district 25, Jesse Lee Reno, “a
youth of great promise,” was nominated by his congressman to be a “Cadet in the service
of the United States.” The Secretary of War notified Jesse Lee of his conditional appointment
in April. In June, he reported to West Point for his entrance examinations.

The Academy, then as now, had exacting standards for physical fitness and academic
preparation. As many as 122 conditional appointees may have reported June of 1842 for
their examinations. When the exams were over the class had 92 survivors. Four years later,
the class of 1846 graduated 59, including Jesse Lee Reno, Thomas Jackson, George Mc-
Clellan and George Picket, all of whom would be generals North or South in the Civil War.
Cadet Reno finished eighth in his class, six files behind George McClellan; nine files
ahead of Thomas Jackson. George Derby, who became a celebrated American humorist,
was seventh. Jesse Reno’s best subject was Mineralogy/Geology, where he finished sixth.
McClellan was first. Thomas Jackson’s best subject was Ethics.


In the Spring of ‘46, while the cadets were cramming for final exams, the United States
declared war on Mexico. On graduation the newly commissioned second lieutenants would
have an early opportunity to test their book learning on the battlefield. Reno was first assigned
as Assistant Ordnance officer to the Watervliet Arsenal, N.Y. By Fall of ‘46 he was
with General Winfield Scott’s forces headed for Mexico.

His war record is impressive. He earned five battle stars, was wounded once; breveted
twice, becoming) a BVT Captain, 13 September, 1847. At the battle of Chapultepec, both
he and Jackson were breveted for “Gallant and Meritorious” conduct. Both were artillery
officers.

In the peacetime years following the war with Mexico, Lt. Reno had artillery and ordnance
assignments commensurate with his high class ranking at graduation. Some were:
Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Military Academy; Secretary of the Board for preparing
a “System of Instruction for Heavy Artillery”; and Ass’t Ordnance Officer, Frankford
Arsenal, Pa.

Another assignment took him west to the Mexican war-won country as Chief of Ordnance
on the Albert Sidney Johnston led Utah Expedition, July 1857-June 1859. On this
visit to Utah Territory he might have met his mother’s cousin, Thomas Harris Parke, who
had come to Utah with the Mormons in 1849. Thomas Harris, however, had accepted
Brigham Young’s invitation to colonize Western Nevada and was ranching in Carson Valley,
just south of the Truckee river watering stop that would be named after Jesse Lee Reno
and grow to be the “Biggest Little City in the World.”

In the Fall of’59, Captain Reno was assigned to the Mt. Vernon Arsenal, near Mobile,
Alabama, as commanding officer. In normal times this would have been a plush post, but
times were not normal. After Lincoln was elected president and the cry of secession spread
across the South the State of Alabama felt justified in seizing the Mt. Vernon Arsenal. This
they did, attacking at dawn 4 Jan 1861 with four companies of militia. They overwhelmed
its garrison of 18 men and Captain Reno.

Without prejudice over the loss of Mt. Vernon, the Army assigned Reno to command the
Leavenworth Arsenal, Kansas. This assignment would be a short one. Our national crisis
was now in full flame and the Army was looking for command leadership. In November,
Reno was promoted to Brig-General Volunteers to command a Brigade in General Burnside’s
invasion of North Carolina. By April 1862 he was commanding a division. In July,
he was promoted to Major General commanding IX Corp, Army of the Potomac.


While Jesse Lee Reno was winning rapid promotion and earning recognition as a battlefield
commander the war was not going well for Union forces. His classmate General
McClellan’s Peninsula campaign to capture Richmond had failed. General Pope’s Army of
Virginia had been outmaneuvered and defeated at the Second Battle of Bull Run.
On 4 September following up his summer successes Confederate General Robert E.
Lee invaded Maryland. He crossed the Potomac north of Washington enroute to Frederick,
Maryland and points beyond. By 6 September, his troops, including Thomas Jackson, now
called Stonewall, were in Frederick. The Barbara Frietchie legend was about to begin.
The Army of the Potomac, staying between Lee’s Army and Washington, began its
march against the Confederate forces 7 September with Reno’s 1x Corp leading. By 12
September they were in Frederick which the Confederates did not seriously defend. General
Reno and his staff spent the night there.

On the morning of the 13th while riding past Barbara Frietschies, General Reno was
drawn to a crowd in front of her house. He listened to the stories of her confrontation with
Confederate troops. He dismounted and at her invitation stepped inside while she served
him a glass of her homemade currant wine. On leaving he offered to buy one of her flags.
She declined but did give him her large bunting flag. With her flag in CoL B.F. Reno’s pistol
case he rode off to face Stonewall Jackson’s Corp at South Mountain.

By mid morning 14 September the forces of General’s Reno and Jackson were engaged
at South Mountain, Fox’s Gap. By mid afternoon Reno’s entire Corp had arrived on the
battleline.

He was at Fox’s Gap personally leading his command. In the early evening, he rode forward
to see what was delaying the right flank’s progress. While in front of his troops in an
exposed position he was hit by musket fife. He was carried off the mountain and died about
an hour later. Barbara Frietchie’s flag would cover General Reno’s casket at his funeral.
And just as Grandmother Achsah was part of Major General Jesse Lee Reno’s inheritance,
so is Barbara’s legend part of his legacy.


Notes, Comments and Major Sources
William F. McConnell’s Remember Reno, A Biography of Major General Jesse Lee
Reno, White Mane Publishing Co., Inc. 1996 has been used for both background and detail
without identifying specific citations.
Roger Reno, Rockford, Illinois, Reno Family Historian provided me with the family
sketches he has written on Charles Reno and Lewis Thomas Reno.
Rev. William Frazer’s Three Parishes-St. Thomas’s. St. Andrew’s and Musconetcong,
N.J.-1768-70 by Henry Race, as printed in the Pennsylvania Magazine of History and
Biography, Vol XII, 1888, pages 212-233 has Achsah’s baptism as well as the Reverend’s
description of his parish problems.
Samuel Quinby’s Revolutionary War Pension file is on LDS film #0971992.
I have made full use of Census records following the moves of the Parkes, Quinbys and
Renos from Washington County, Pa 1790, to Nevada 1860 and back to Iowa 1870. The last
census Achsah appears on is Mercer County, Pa, 1850. She is living with her son Charles
Quinby and appears as “Acey” age 83, born New Jersey. The General’s last census is 1860,
Mobile, Alabama with his wife and two children.
Barbara Frietschie, the woman, the poem, the myth, the flag, is examined in two articles.
The first by Conrad Reno, the General’s son, written in 1900 and republished by Broadfoot
Publishing Company, 1993. My copy, sent to me by the Curator, Civil War Library, Philadelphia.
The second record, by Dorothy and William Quynn, published in the Maryland
Historical Magazine, September 1942. A copy was sent to me by The Historical Society of
Frederick County, Frederick, Maryland.
The life of West Point cadets in 1846 is described in John C. Waugh’s Class of 1846.
Warner Books, 1994. He also covers the entrance examination procedures of that year.
The Archives Curator, United States Military Academy furnished me with photocopies
of data relevant to General Reno from Official Register, Officers and Cadets, US Military
Academy, June 1846, and Biographical Register of the Officers and Graduates, U.S. Military
Academy from 1802-1890.
The Quinbys and the Renos are a family historian’s delight. They make full use of family
names from generation to generation. Additionally, the Renos seem to have adopted the
use of two given names frequently reduced to initials very early.
.





Saturday, December 8, 2012

Unsung Utah war explored on Discovery Road : WeAreSanpete.com

Unsung Utah war explored on Discovery Road : WeAreSanpete.com

 Its about our Relic Home. But more of an advertisement for 

 “Utah’s Blackhawk War: Cultures in Conflict..”  A documentary made in 1998 with Merrill Osmond.  However, many local historians will tell you that the documentary is more historical fiction than truth.

Female Relief Society June 11, 1877

Meeting held June 11th 1877
 Opened with singing
Prayer by Sister Morrison
Sister Morrison addressed the sisters and said that business called her away and prevented her to attend fully to this meeting and she hoped that all the sisters  .... for a good purpose, so they will have a good time anyhow.

 After she left most all the sisters bore their testimonies in a faithful manner. Sister Josephsen spoke and felt like she would try to do good, but she can not .......she seeks to be a good Latter Day Saint and a good member of the Society, but she thought she could not come  ..... to it.

Sister Christine Jensen then testified that she visited Sister Josephsen's house almost from the beginning of the Society, and that she never left her home without a gift for the poor, and as a general thing treated the sisters with something good to eat

Sister Fechser brought in the report how she was getting along at Manti, looking for the Brethren felt well and was glad to do a little good towards the great work and was glad to have been chosen.

Sister Peterson spoke some about the silkworms and encouraged the sisters to take an interest in it and also she bore a faithful testimony to the truth; said that she was baptized in the church for 24 years and never faltered a minute, that this kingdom? was not the only truth in this world.

All felt well and a good spirit prevailed.

Meeting was closes with singing "We Thank Thee God for the the Prophet and prayer by Sister Peterson.

MFC Morrison Pres.
Louise Hasler, Sec

Friday, December 7, 2012




Yes, we are still raking leaves because there is no SNOW here in Mt. Pleasant!!!

Thursday, December 6, 2012

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE SEELY FAMILY











The following is taken from Seely Family History, compiled by Montell Seely.  Montell has made numerous corrections to the original record:

Compiled from the Family Record made under the direction of Justus Azael Seely, and also  from the verbal recollections of Mrs. Clarissa Jane Seely.

According to Justus Azael Seely, the oldest ancestor of his family known was JOHN SEELY, a Welshman, who died in Connecticut, U.S.A., but no data is obtainable either of his birth or death.  This John Seely had a son named Joseph; of whom again we have no other knowledge except that his wife's name was Margarett, and that they had a son named Justus, and five other children, Abner, Joseph, Margarett, Thankful, and Kesiah, (who is not found on any family group sheets) This Justus Seely was born and lived in Connecticut where he married Sarah Stuart, and with her raised a family of five children named: Orange, Stuart, Philo, Philo (Montell inserts here that he believes there was only one Philo. But where is the fifth child then?) and Justus Azael Seely; the last named being born November 17, 1779.

About the time of the American Revolution, Justus and his entire family left the United States and removed to Nova Scotia, where they lived about seven years (according to the statement of Justus Azael Seely made to Mrs. Clarissa Jane Seely).  Then afterwards they returned to the United States and lived for some time in Pennsylvania, on the Susquehanna River.

Here Justus Azael became acquainted with and married Mehetabel Bennet, daughter of Amos Bennet, daughter of Amos Bennett and Anna Duncan.  She was born 17 November 1779, on the same day as her husband. (Montell interjects: It is my personal opinion that this is an error.)  Justus Azael Seely and his wife Mehetabel resided in Pennsylvania until about 1811,  (Error.  They moved in 1807) when they removed to Uppoer Canada, together with Father Justus Seely and his wife Sarah, locating in Pickering, in what was called the Holme District.

When they left Pennsylvania they had five children; named as follows:  Rachel Seely, b. 2d Sept. 1801; Rebecca Seely, b 4 July, 1893; John Seely (2nd), b 8 Juhne 1805; Elizabeth Seely, b. 29 July, 1807; Mary Seely, b. 24 Jan. 1810. (Error, Elizabeth was born in Steuben Co., NY, and Mary was born in Canada.) While living in Pickering Home District, Upper Canada, four more children were born to them:  William Stuart Seely, b. 18 May 1812, Justus Wellington Seely, b. 30 Jan. 1815; Sarah Ann Seely, b. 27 Aug. 1817; and David Seely, b. 12 Oct. 1819.

In January, 1812, when the war broke out with the U.S., Justus Azael was drafted into the military service and was subsequently quartered at the barracks in Toronto. (Error: Justus Azael had served in the militia from 1808.)  Here he stayed until about May, 1812, when the illness of his wife necessitated his returning home on furlough, while his own father Justus Seely supplied his place in the barracks.  On May 18th, 1812 Mehitabel Seely, Justus Azael's wife was confined, and on the same day, while in Toronto in his son, Justus Azael's place, father Justus Seely died. (Justus Azael stated that his father "died in Markham of a disease he contracted during the late war.") 

Justus Azael Seely continued to reside in Upper Canada until about 1838, when together with his wife, his daughters, Sarah and Elizabeth and their  husbands, and also  his sons John,  William, Justus, and David, he emigrated to Missouri.

William and the old folks went by way of the Great Lakes in a steamer, while David and Wellington traveled in wagons.  They expected  to meet in DeWitt Co. Missouri, but ere they arrived there the Missouri mobs had already driven the Saints from house and home, and all the members of the Seely family, seperated as they were,  were also driven back in the general retreat.  But the Lord protected them, and they found each other in Calhoun Co., Illinois in Nov. 1838.

In the spring of 1839 they removed to the vicinity of Burlington, Iowa, where they remained until the spring of 1841, when the parents and the three sons, William, Justus W., and David, located at Nashville, now Galland, Lee Co., Illinois.

William Stuart Seely was married before leaving Canada to his first wife, Elizabeth Dehart, who had faithfully shared with him all the trials of these times.  Justus Wellington was married by Bro. Cyrus H. Wheelock on the 10th of March 1842 to Clarissa Jane Wilcox, daughter of Hazard Wilcox and Sarah Seely Wilcox. He and his wife resided on his own farm of 100 acres near the river.

Aside from tilling the ground Justus W. was kept busy as a boatman on the River, as he, in company with hsi brothers William and David, operated a flatboat, which they used to convey parts of steamer cargoes over the Keokuk Rapids.  These were not then improved as they are now, but were a costly hindrance to navigation.  This occupation of assisting boats over the rapids was necessarily a very lucrative one at times, and the proceeds supplied the family with all the extra money they needed.

Three children were born here to Jusus Wellington and Clarissa Jane Seely, and they lived as happy and busy lives until the Exodus of the Saints from Nauvoo also necessitated their removal.  About this time Mary Seely Hemingway and her husband also came from Canada and located at Nashville, Lee Co., Iowa, purchasing the properties of Justus Azael and Wm Seely, thus enabling them to leave with the Saints.  Mrs. Rebecca Seely Young and David Young, her husband whose emigration from Canada had been made possible in 1841 by the assistance of the whole family also remained in Lee Co., Iowa,  and  eventually died there.

Justus Wellington Seely was able  to dispose of his farm for $200.00 and  this with 2 yoke of oxen, one wagon,  4 cows , and a few household utensils, etc., was all that the tender  mercyof the mob hadleft  him to make the long journey to the Rocky Mts.

Wm. S. Seely and Justus W. Seely and their families left Nashville together  on the 16th of June 1846 on thrir journey westward reaching Winter Quarters on the Missouri about the 20 Oct. 1846.  There they built a small house in which they spent the winter.

On the 8th of June 1847 they crossed the Mo. River and started again with the Pioneer Train the 13 of June.  When the Saints were organized on the Elkhorn  in companies, they were numbered among John Taylor's 100. (Error:  They were in Edward Hunter's 100)  Jacob Foutz's 50 and John Lowry's 10.  They started at the Elkhorn on the 14th of June and arrived in Salt Lake City on the 30th of Sept., 1847.

Here they lived first in the old South Fort in the 5th Ward, and later in the 14th Ward.

On the 5th of November 1849 Justus W. Seely, David Seely and Edwin Petit started for the gold fields of California, by way of the Southern Route.  Arriving at San  Pedro in California they took passage for San Francisco on the first day of April 1850, on the ship  "Sea Bird", a small sailing vessel, arriving in San Francisco after a very tempestuous journey on the 112th day of April, 1850.  After staying there a few days they went to the Goldfields of the Greenwood valley on the American River, where they worked in the gold diggings.  However, Wellington's healthe soon failed him, and he was obliged to give up his work.

About this time Brothers Charles Rich and Amasa Lyman and Dr. Bernhisel who were also in the Goldfields with a company, decided to return to Great Salt Lake Valley, and so accordingly they all returned  with them, arriving in Salt Lake City on the 25th of Sept, 1850.

The stay in Salt Lake City was, however, only brief, for in January 1851, Justus W. and David were called to go to California as colonists under the direction of Apostles Charles C. Rich and Amasa Lyman.  They left Salt Lake City  on the 13th of March, 1851 and reached their destination, San Bernardino in Southern California, on the 11th of June of the same year.

Justus Wellington Seely lived in San Bernardino seven years; during which time he was engaged in farming and later in the saw mill business.  While in Salt Lake City two more children had been born to the family; Hyrum Seely and Justus Wellington Jr.  In California three children were born to Justus W. and Clarissa Jane Seely; William H., and John H., and Mary Miranda.

In 1857, at the time of the Johnson or Buchanan War, the California Colonizing Mission was dissolved, and the colonists were recalled by order of Pres. Young.  This was again the cause of great sacrifice on the part of Wellington Seely, because he was obliged to sell his property for little or nothing and return to a land where he had to begin everything anew. David Seely and his family remained in San Bernardino.

On the 20th day of March, 1858, (in Orange Seely's family reunion address he said the date was April 23, 1858) Justus Wellington Seely and his family reached Pleasant Grove, Utah Co., Utah. where they found their father Justus Azael  and their mother Mehitabel, and his brother William Stuart Seely, who had remained in Utah all this time.

In 1859 Justus Wellington was again called upon to leave his temporary home in order to help colonize the central and  southern part of Utah; arriving at Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., Utah, on the 28th day of April, 1859.  Here his brother, William Stuart Seely, had been called upon to preside over the new ward as the first bishop of Mt. Pleasant.  Here Justus Wellington located in the western part of the city, on the block just opposite where the depot (once) stood.  The old homestead was on the S.E. corner of the block, and was removed in 1895 when Stuart Seely built his residence on the site.  Orange Seely owned the two west ots on the same block, and built his home on the S.W. corner, where he lived until he removed to Castle Valley, 14th Oct. 1880, when he sold to his father, Wellington Seely.

Henceforth Justus Wellington Seely and his wife occupied this home, and here Justus Wellington died in 1894.

Three children were born to the family while living in Mt. Pleasant: David, Joseph, and Stuart R.  David died when about one year old.  All the rest of the children attained to the age of manhood and womanhood.

William Stuart Seely, who had been  appointed Bishop of Mt. Pleasant Ward, was also the  progenitor of a large family.  He had three wives.  He died one year after his younger brother Wellington in Sept, 1895.

Justus Wellington Seely was married 17 Nov. 1873 to his second wife Sarah Jane McKinney and by her had one child, Eva Rebecca, born 6 December 1874.

All the children of Justus Wellington Seely and Clarissa Jane were married, and each has a number of children.  Orange Seely, the oldest was married in Mt. Pleasant to Hannah Olsen, on July 24th, 1863, by Elder Orson Hyde.  They had nine children.  (This brief history was written between 1895 and 1903)

Sunday, December 2, 2012

Photos from Hilda's Album ~ Johannah Madsen Hafen Collection

On reverse it says :  "My friend Ernest McClellan"    H , Presumably Hilda



On reverse it sayss:
"Dan Omen
June 12, 1898"

Saturday, December 1, 2012

Claus Wilheim Anderson History ~ Pioneer of the Month ~ December 2012 ~ compiled by Judy Malkiewicz


Claus Wilhelm Anderson
aka Claus Wilhelm Josephsson
Born 1 April 1838; Died 6 January 1923
(Hazel Theora Jensen Anderson Lundberg’s Adopted Father)

Claus Wilhelm Anderson’s name was Claus Wilhelm Josephsson in Sweden. 
Claus was born 1 April 1838 in Sweden to father, Joseph Anderson (b 11 Dec 1805 in Alvsborg, Norrbotten, Sweden, d 2 Jun 1884 in Mt. Pleasant, Utah and mother, Maja aka Marie Stina aka Christine Magnison Anderson (b 18 Jan 1814 in Alvsborg, Norrbotten, Sweden, d 1 Jun 1883 in Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete, Utah. Joseph and Maja were married 24 May 1835 in Bona Redvag, Alvborg, Sweden.

The Joseph Anderson family immigrated to Mt. Pleasant, Utah in 1861 with the Samuel A. Woolley Company departing 12-13 July 1861 from Florence Nebraska (now Omaha) with 338 souls and 61 wagons. The Anderson family arrived in Salt Lake City 22 September 1861 when Joseph was 55 years old and Marie was 47. It is believed that they came with all of their children, however Claus is not listed. Claus' obituary indicates he came to Mt. Pleasant, Utah in 1866 when he was 28 years old.

Below are the “Anderson” surnames who immigrated from Sweden to Mt. Pleasant, Utah in 1861 with the Samuel A. Woolley Company (Not sure of the relationships). Claus Anderson does not seem to be listed and his name cannot be found in any company. Claus’s father, Joseph Anderson is listed as being 55 years old and his mother, Maria Christine Lundberg Anderson is listed as being age 47.


Claus’s father, Joseph Anderson died 2 Jun 1884 in Mt. Pleasant, Utah and is buried in the Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery  Plot: A_114_3_2. He lived in Mt. Pleasant, Utah for 23 years before his death. His headstone is unusual in that his surname “Anderson” is divided on two lines “An” and ‘Dersen” and it appears incorrectly spelled with “sen” vs “son” at the end.

Claus’s mother, Maria Christine Lundberg Anderson died in Mt. Pleasant, Utah on 1 Jun 1883 at the age of 69 years. She lived in Mt. Pleasant for 22 years before her death.  She is buried in the Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery Plot: A_114_3_1 (her headstone is badly damaged).



Claus had 9 siblings,
1. John Eric Anderson or Josephsen (b 1835). May have died in 1908 and is buried in the Logan City Cemetery, Utah.
2. Carolina C. Anderson (b 1837). Immigrated 1861 at age of 29 (listed as age 23 on records).
3. Claus Wilhelm (b 1838) Immigrated to the Utah Territory in 1866 when he was 23 years old.
4. Carl August Anderson or Josephsen (1840)
5. Carl August Anderson (1842)
6. Sophia Charlotte Anderson (1845)
7. Frans Oscar Anderson (1848)
8. Oscar F. Anderson (b 13 Dec 1849, d 17 Aug 1936). Buried in the Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery, Mt. Pleasant, Utah Plot: A_114_3_6. Oscar married Chastie Neilsen Anderson (b 1860 – d 1939). See end for Chastie’s obituary.
9. Matilida Josephine Anderson Burns Bennett (b 10 Mar 1853 d 13 Feb 1936 of acute myocarditis at age 82 years). Matilida Josephine Anderson married twice. First to Sheriff James Burns who was killed in the line of duty as a peace officer and second to Rudolphus N. Bennett. See end for Matlida’s obituary and Utah Death Certificate. 
10. Edwin Theodore Anderson (1859)

Claus’ married twice. First, to Stina Greta Andersdotter (b 1858-?) in 1858 in Sweden and second to Hanna Persson Jensen Anderson (b 1841, d 1925) in 1873 in Utah.

Hanna Jensen Anderson aka Mrs. Claus Anderson

Claus served in the Utah Territory militia in 1867 for 6 months. He was listed in their files as Claudeus Anderson and served 1 May 1867 to 1 Nov 1867 earning $96 dollar over the 6 months.

“Pay-roll of Captain Frederick Neilson’s company – infantry, Utah Territory militia, employed in the suppression of Indian hostilities in Sanpete County, Utah Territory form May 1, 1867, to November 1, 1867.” 

“We, the undersigned, acknowledge to have received from James W. Cummings, paymaster Utah Territory militia, the sums opposite to our names, in full payment for our services for the time specified


“This company was mustered into service at Mount Pleasant, Sanpete County, May 1, 1867, by Brigadier General Wm. B. Pace, and by him assigned to duty in vicinity of same settlement; they were in active service every day as I cerify that the above account is correct. H.B. Clawson, Adjutant General Utah Territory Militia.”




After the Black Hawk War, Claus W. Anderson and Hanna Jensen Anderson had five children together, however, their birth order is unclear.
  • William C. "Will" Anderson aka Claus William Anderson (b 17 Mar 1873, d 22 Sept 1965 at age 91 years); Married Bertha E. Young Anderson (b 20 Sept 1878, d 11 Feb 1970 at age 91 years; Bertha's parents were David E. Young and Mary Evans). Will and Bertha had 5 children together:
    • Alton W. Anderson (b 27 Sept 1911, d 26 Dec 1911 at age 2 months, 19 days, "Our little rosebud"
    • Nathella M. Anderson Hughes; married Jim Hughes (children Shirley and Carla)
    • Dorothea Constance Anderson Bergstrom Simmons (b 11 Aug 1908, d 2 Dec 1971 in Salt Lake City. Dorothea was married twice - 1st to Simmons and divorced and 2nd to Paul Scheller Bergstrom (b 1906, d 1972). Dorothea and Paul Bergstrom's children: Jack Bergstrom and Donna Bergstrom.
    • Clarence William "Bus" Anderson (b 8 Sept 1912, d Sept 1981) married Katherine Clark Anderson and had children John Warren Anderson (California), Eric Anderson (California), Tony Anderson (Idaho), and Kristin Anderson (Odgen, Utah)
    • Donald Edward Anderson (b 15 May 1903, d 26 May 1989 at age 86 years and buried a Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery, Mt. Pleasant, Utah). Married Ina Elizabeth Madsen Anderson (b 1910, d1999). Child Gary Anderson (b 1943, d 1999).
  • Unknown Twin Boy died early
  • Unknown Twin Boy died early
  • Oscar Anderson (1848-1936); Married Chastie Nielsen (1860-1939). Oscar and Chastie had 6 children together:
    • Oscar Francis Anderson (1879-1887)
    • Archie J. Anderson (1881-1887)
    • Lettie C. Anderson (1883-1887)
    • Anna Letitia Anderson Meiling (1888-1972)
    • Gerald Leroy Anderson (1891-1912)
    • Addie M. Anderson VaneveraStang (1896-1976)
  • Hazel Theora Jensen Anderson (22 Jan1889 – adopted from birth mother (Hilda Jensen Jensen) Hilda’s, father’s (Andrew Peter Jensen) sister Hanna Jensen Andersson Anderson and her 2nd husband, Claus Anderson (born 1 Apr 1938 and died 6 Jan 1923). Hanna was Hazel’s great-aunt. Hazel and her husband, Maple Henning Lundberg had three children together:
    • Rex Henning Lundberg
    • Edward Auer Lundberg
    • Marjorie Christine Lundberg Malkiewicz
In the 1880 Mt. Pleasant, Utah Census, Claus W. Anderson was 44 years of age and listed as a farmer. His wife, Hanna, age 39, was keeping house and they had 3 children living at home:

  • Claus W. Anderson aka William C. “Will” Anderson, age 6
  • Oscar I Anderson, age 1
  • M. Rasmussen, age 12 (perhaps a hired helper)
The Anderson family lived in Mt. Pleasant, Utah at 308 South 300 West, Mt. Pleasant, Utah Plat A Block 66 Lot 1 

From the Mt. Pleasant, Utah Blog

Same house pictured below in 1994 is still standing today in 2012. It is rumored that Claus’s initials are carved in a shed in the back.
308 South 300 West, Mt. Pleasant, Utah Plat A Block 66 Lot 1
Claus Anderson is credited with bringing the first telegraph to Sanpete County, Utah.

Claus died 6 January 1923 at the age of 84 years at his home in Mt. Pleasant, Utah after long illness of paralysis leaving his widow, Hanna at the family home.

Aged Mt. Pleasant Pioneer Succumbs
Mount Pleasant. Jan. 8. Claus Anderson, an aged pioneer, died at his home her last evening. He was born in Sweden, April 1, 1838. Two children survive, William Anderson of this city and Mrs. M.H. Lundberg of Mackay, Idaho. Also one brother and one sister, Mrs. R.N. Bennett and Oscar Anderson, both of Mount Pleasant. From Salt Lake Telegram 8 Jan 1923.

Claus Anderson, one of the earliest settlers in Mt. Pleasant died at his home here Saturday evening after a long illness from paralysis. Mr. Anderson was born in Sweden, April 1, 1838 coming to Utah as a young man and to Mt. Pleasant with one of the first companies of pioneers.
He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Hannah J. Anderson, a son, W.C. Anderson of this city, a daughter, Mrs. M.H. Lundberg of Mackay, Idaho, and a sister, Mrs. R.N. Bennett and a brother, Oscar Anderson, both of this city.
President Adolph Merz was in charge of the funeral services held Wednesday afternoon in the South Ward chapel. The ward choir furnished special music and a ladies quartet composed ob the Misses Ethel Lund, Rhoda Ericksen, Ovie Monsen, and Faughn Poulsen sang several numbers. The invocation was offered by Peter Monsen and the speakers were President Merz, William Olson, C.W. Anderson, and Henry P. Olsen. The benediction was pronounced by C.M. Petersen and Henry P. Olsen dedicated the grave. The pallbearers, all of them Indian War Veterans, former comrades of Mr. Anderson were Olof Rosenlof, John Stansfield, Hyrum Seely, John Carlson, Hazzard Wilcox, and Joseph Wise.
Mr. Anderson served with Captain Fred Neilson’s Company in the Black Hawk Indian Wars. He came to Mt. Pleasant in 1866 and helped to build the first telegraph line to enter Sanpete County and in other way helped in the upbuilding of this young community. From the Hazel Theora Jenseon Anderson Lundberg Collection - Source Unknown


Funeral Held For Pioneer Resident
Mount Pleasant. Jan. 12. Funeral services for Claus Anderson, pioneer resident of Mount Pleasant, were held in the South Ward Chapel Wednesday afternoon with President Adolph Merz in charge. Music was furnished by the ward choir and a ladies quartet, comprising the Misses Ethel Lund, Olive Monsen, Rhoda Ericksen and Faughn Poulsen. The speakers were William Olsen, C. W. Sorensen, Henry P. Olsen, and President C.W. Merz. Prayers were offered by Peter Monsen and C.M.Peterson. The grave in the City Cemetery was dedicated by Henry P. Olsen. From Salt Lake Telegram 12 Jan 1923. 


Early Mt. Pleasant Settler Dies After Extended Illness
Special in the Tribune.
Mt. Pleasant. Jan 7 – Claus Anderson, one of the earliest settlers of Mt. Pleasant, died at his home here Saturday evening, after a long illness.
He was born in Sweden, April 1, 1838, coming to Utah as a young man, and to Mt. Pleasant with one of the first companies of pioneers. He aided in the building of the young community and served in the Black Hawk Indian War. Surviving him are his widow, Mrs. Hannah J. Anderson: a son, W.C. Anderson of Mt. Pleasant; a daughter, Mrs. M.H. Lundberg of Mackay, Idaho; a sister, Mrs. R.N. Bennett, and a brother, Oscar Anderson, both living here. Funeral services will be held either Tuesday or Wednesday afternoon, according to the arrival of relatives. From the Hazel Theora Jensen Anderson Lundberg Collection - Source Unknown.

Veteran of Indian Wars Buried in Mt. Pleasant
Special to the Tribune.
Mt. Pleasant. Jan. 11 – President Adolph Merz was in charge of the funeral services for Claus Anderson held yesterday afternoon in the South Ward Chapel. The ward choir furnished special music and a ladies quartet, composed of the Misses Ethel Lund, Rhoda Ericksen, Olive Monson and Faughn Poulsen sang several numbers. The invocation was offered by Peter Monson and the speakers were President Merz, William Olson, C.W. Sorensen and Henry P. Olsen. The benediction was pronounced by C.M. Petersen and Henry P. Olsen dedicated the grave. The pallbearers, all of them Indian War Veterans, former comrades of Mr. Anderson, were Olof Rosenlof, John Stansfield, Hyrum Seely, John Carlson, Hazzard Willcox and Joseph Wise. Mr. Anderson served with Captain Fred Neilsen’s Company in the Black Hawk Indian War. He came to Mt. Pleasant in 1866 and helped build the first telegraph line to enter Sanpete County and in other ways helped in the upbuilding of the young community. From the Hazel Theora Jensen Anderson Lundberg Collection - Source Unknown.

Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery A_70_4_5
After Claus’s death, his widow, Hanna Jensen Anderson was awarded his Black Hawk Indian Veteran Pension of $12 per month in May 1923 (see last sentence from Salt Lake Telegram 10 May 1923). "A pension of $12 a month, dating from last January 7, is allowed to Mrs. Hannah J. Anderson of Mount Pleasant, widow of Claus Anderson."



Claus’s second wife, Hanna Jensen Anderson died 13 May 1925.
Pioneer Woman Found Dead at Home on Couch – 1925. Mrs. Hannah J. Anderson.
Special to the Tribune.
Mt. Pleasant – May 14 – Mrs. Hannah J. Anderson (Andersen), widow of Claus Anderson and a pioneer of this city, was found dead at her home in this city last evening when her son, W.C. Anderson went to call on her. Mrs. Anderson apparently had ben in her usual health and indications showed that she had lain down on a couch during the afternoon and had passed away while sleeping. Mrs. Anderson was born January 26, 1841, at Kayrnhedding, Malmo Lane, Sweden. Her husband and eldest child died in Sweden, and on November 14, 1871, Mrs. Anderson came to Utah. She was married to Claus Anderson in Mt. Pleasant, June 1, 1873, and they were the parents of four children, only one of whom survives, W.C. Anderson of this city. Mrs. Anderson also is survived by an adopted daughter, Mrs. M.H. Lundberg of Mackay, Idaho; a twin sister, Mrs. Anna Jensen Fredricksen, of this city, and another sister, Mrs. Charles Benson of Los Angeles, California. Seven grandchildren and one great-grandchild also survive. Mr. Anderson who was an Indian War veteran, died two and a half years ago. Funeral arrangements will not be completed until the arrival of relatives.


Hanna (Hannah) Jensen Anderson is buried at the Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery Plot A_70_4_6 next to her husband, Claus Anderson.
Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery, Mt. Pleasant, Utah

Claus Anderson's sister, Matilda J. A. B. Bennett.
Mrs. Matilda Josephine Anderson Burns Bennett, 82, died Thursday evening following a lingering illness of causes incident to age. Mrs. Bennett was the widow of former Sheriff James Burn (b 1849, d 1984), early peace officer of Sanpete county, who was shot and killed by outlaws during a cattle foray in the mountains east of Spring City. Her oldest son, James Milton Burns (b 1873, d 1934) was killed while on duty as a guard at a Utah Fuel company mine in Castle Gate. He died of injuries suffered when beaten by a negro who later was lynched by a mob. Born in Jutland, Sweden, March 10, 1853, Mrs. Bennett was a daughter of Joseph and Marie Hogenson Anderson, who came to Utah in 1860. She was married o Sheriff Burns in Salt Lake City in 1869 and lived in Manti until his death in 1894. She had 2 sons James Milton Burns (b 1873, d 1925) and Clifton Thomas Burns (b 1879, d 1934). She married Rodolphus N. Bennett (b 1843, d 1927) an Indian war veteran. In 1902, and lived here. He died in 1926. Five sons and two daughters survive: Mrs. Lydia Williams and A.A. Burns, Willow Creek, Montana; Mrs. Beatrice Olson, Mt. Pleasant; J. H. Burns, Marysvale, and Reed Burns, Manhattan Beach California; a brother, Oscar Anderson, Mt. Pleasant; 19 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Salt Lake Tribune February 15, 1936.


Pioneer Mt. Pleasant Woman Succumbs At Home To Long Illness
Feb 13, 1936
Mt. Pleasant – Mrs. Matilda Josephine Anderson Burns Bennett, 82, died Thursday evening following a lingering illness of causes incident to age. Mrs. Bennett was the widow of former Sheriff James Burns, early peace officer of Sanpete County who was shot and killed by outlaws during a cattle foray in the mountains east of Spring City. Her oldest son, James Milton Burns, also a former Deputy Sheriff, was killed while on duty as a guard at a Utah Fuel company mine in Castlegate. He died of injuries suffered when beaten by a negro who later was lynched by a mob. Born in Jutland, Sweden, March 10, 1853, Mrs. Bennett was a daughter of Joseph and Marie Hogenson Anderson, who came to Utah in 1860. She was married to Sheriff Burns in Salt Lake City in 1869 and lived in Manti until his death in 1894. She married Rodolphus N. Bennett, an Indian War veteran, in 1902, and lived here. He died in 1928. Five sons and two daughters survive: Mrs. Lydia Williams and A.A. Burns, Willow Creek, Montana; Mrs. Beatrice Olson, Mt. Pleasant; J.H. Burns, Marysvale and Reed Burns, Manhattan Beach, California; a brother, Oscar Anderson, Mt. Pleasant; 19 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.

[Matilda had 9 siblings in total:
1.    John Eric Anderson or Josephsen (b 1835). May have died in 1908 and is buried in the Logan City Cemetery, Utah.
2.    Carolina C. Anderson (b 1837). Immigrated 1861 at age of 29 (listed as age 23 on immigration company records).
3.    Claus Wilhelm (b 1838) Immigrated to the Utah Territory in 1866 when he was 28 years old. Lived in Mt. Pleasant. Black Hawk Indian War Veteran died in 1923.
4.    Carl August Anderson or Josephsen (1840)
5.    Carl August Anderson (1842
6.    Sophia Charlotte Anderson (1845)
7.    Frans Oscar Anderson (1848)
8.    Oscar F. Anderson (b 13 Dec 1849, d 17 Aug 1936). Buried in the Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery, Mt. Pleasant, Utah Plot: A_114_3_6. Oscar married Chastie Neilsen Anderson (b 1860 – d 1939).
9.    Edwin Theodore Anderson (1859)]
Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery, Mt. Pleasant, Utah

Claus Anderson's brother, Oscar Anderson and his wife, Chastie Neilsen Anderson.

Funeral for Chastie Anderson
Funeral services for Mrs. Chastie Anderson were held Saturday, December 16th at 2 p.m. in the North Ward Chapel with Bishop Henry P. Olsen presiding. Opening song, “Sometime Somewhere” was rendered by the choir. Invocation was offered by P.A. Peel. Choir sang “Rock of Ages”. O.F. Peel paid tribute to her memory. Vocal solo “In the Garden” was rendered by Ralph Hafen. Mrs. Margaret Hampshire eulogized her character. Vocal solo “That Wonderful Mother of Mine” was sung by Mrs. Pearl Peterson. Closing remarks were given by Bishop Henry P. Olsen. Closing song, “Abide With Me” was rendered by the choir. Benediction was offered by Jos Monsen. The grave in the City Cemetery was dedicated by Wilford West. From the Hazel Theora Jensen Anderson Lundberg Collection - Source Unknown.


Funeral for Chastie Anderson
Funeral services for Mrs. Chastie Anderson were held Saturday, December 16th at 2 p.m. in the North Ward Chapel with Bishop Henry P. Olsen presiding. Opening song, “Sometime Somewhere” was rendered by the choir. Invocation was offered by P.A. Peel. Choir sang “Rock of Ages”. O.F. Peel paid tribute to her memory. Vocal solo “In the Garden” was rendered by Ralph Hafen. Mrs. Margaret Hampshire eulogized her character. Vocal solo “That Wonderful Mother of Mine” was sung by Mrs. Pearl Peterson. Closing remarks were given by Bishop Henry P. Olsen. Closing song, “Abide With Me” was rendered by the choir. Benediction was offered by Jos Monsen. The grave in the City Cemetery was dedicated by Wilford West. From the Hazel Theora Jensen Anderson Lundberg Collection - Source Unknown.

Oscar and Chastie N Anderson along with their son Gerald Leroy Anderson are buried at the Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery in Mt. Pleasant, Utah.

Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery A_114_3_6, Mt. Pleasant, Utah 




Genealogy Quote



"In all of us there is a hunger, marrow-deep, to know our heritage - to know who we are and where we have come from."



~Alex Haley




L.D.S. Temple

L.D.S. Temple
Manti Temple