Relic Home and Blacksmith Shop

Monday, February 28, 2011

The Junction House at Thistle, Utah

The Junction House at Thistle was sort of a Hostelry where railroad crews and boarders could stay the night

Female Relief Society August , 1876

Meeting Held August 11th.  Opened with singing "Guide Us O Thou Great Jehova".  Prayer by Brother Page.  Singing, "O Firming Foundation".  Sister Morrison introduced Brother Page to the sisters and was glad for the opportunity of having him in our midst to speak a word of import to us. 

Brother Page rose and spoke especially of faith, showed us how to obtain faith, to get all things we need in time.  He taught us to keep the commandments of the Lord and to teach our children to do the same by prayer.  He introduced us to some of the stories of his life; how he was traveling from settlement to setttlement to bless the sick and the afflicted, what a great comfort it was to him when he could do good; how the Lord blessed him through faith in the Lord.  All his remarks were very interesting and instructive.  He also encouraged the sisters for the good of our society, and promised to come agian whenever the spirit directed him to do so. 

Sister Morrison then said that she feels the great responsibility that rests upon her to lead this society and felt built up by the good instruction of Brother Page and invited him to come again.

Sister Peel, Sister Simpson and Sister Peterson bore faithful testimony to the truth of the Gospel and all went away rejoicing after singing and prayer.

MFMC Morrison, President
Louise Hasler, Secretary

Sunday, February 27, 2011

Main Street Mt. Pleasant and Doughboy

Do you see the Doughboy at the intersection (Far right)? This was its original location.  This photo was taken in 1938.

Alice Evans Daniels Christensen Funeral Program December 13, 2002

The "LockUp" 1874 - 1878

The council took into consideration the plausibility of building a city hall and jail. Moved and seconded to build same, at least as far as to finish the basement, or lower rooms this year. . . . . Salt Lake City ordinances were adopted. . . . . David Candland appointed city attorney. . . .  Committee on building city hall reported. . . . . decided for the present to rent a place for a Lockup. . . . . . . December 28th, meeting at six p.m. . . . . . Peter Monsen and Paul Delhi were each fined $2.00 for non attendance in proper time. . . . . . Taxes were remitted for twenty-four people. . . . . A petition for the remittance of taxes of the signers for labor performed in erecting a liberty pole last 24th of July was read and decided that no appropriation should be made for that purpose, nor taxes of signers remitted.



John Waldermar and W. W. Brandon were appointed a com­mittee to rent and furnish a building to be used as a "Lockup." p 149 and 154  "History of Mt. Pleasant"  by Hilda Madsen Longsdorf

A special meeting of the city council was held October 24, 1877, to consider the propriety of building a Lockup, with height enough to admit a general office above, giving room for all city purposes, and thereby save renting and contingent expenses. After some discussion as to finances, etc., Mr. A. H. Bennett presented a bid in three divisions, one for finished Lockup, $275.00, one for Lockup with additional rooms above, $375.00, and one for Lockup with temporary roof for less than $275.00. Council decided that time and necessity for the building and the known honor of the contracting party, no further bids would be asked and the contract was given Mr. -Bennett, agreeable to the con¬tingency that may arise as to finances in the matter of completion.


"The signed contract, with two signers was duly signed and placed on file in recorder Candland's office, . . . . . the building was completed and received by the city. Corporation notes for $250.00 were given to Mr. Bennett who delivered two keys to the mayor who delivered them to the marshal who was instructed to get bedding, etc. Councilor Peter Monsen was authorized to purchase a suitable stove."

During this time, various problems were discussed in the council rooms: clear titles, liquor ordinances, streets, sidewalks, bridges, irrigation rights, constitutionality, licenses, petitions, re-mittances of taxes, and resignations of officers.

p 154 HML
 
Rock Removed from North Fort Wall


The city records of 1878 state:

"The question of allowing persons to take rock from around

the public square, north, was presented; the same was allowed, providing a wall four feet is left around said public square." . . . . "The council decided to move from its present office over the post office, and to pay Joseph Page $2.50 a month." . . . . "The marshal said by representation of a prisoner to sickness at night, he wished council concerning allowing one of the police to sleep with said prisoner, also to labor of said prisoner, and as to where he should take his meals. Council sanctioned that some one sleep with the prisoner. There being no ordinance as to labor of pris¬oners, this cannot be enforced. That the prisoner take his meals in jail." . . . . . "Question of granting license for the sale of liquor, the council unanimously expressed themselves not in favor of li¬censing the sale, if it could possibly be avoided, but it seemed impossible to stop sale, and thought under present circumstances they had better license than do worse." . . . . . "On motion of Peter Monsen, agreed to fence the lockup with lumber twelve feet high."

A twelve foot high lumber fence was placed around the lockup. The lockup referred to was the one built the year previous, and was a rock building, built on the north public square or north fort. Few claim they ever saw the inside of this lockup, but many do remember a prisoner, who in the early hours of the morning, would sit upon the roof of the building and sing the popular songs of the day. This, however, was after the high board fence had been placed around it.

The story is told that prior to this, a policeman, and by the way there were many, after locking up a prisoner, when turning a corner on Main Street, came face to face with the prisoner.


Rock Removed from North Fort Wall


The city records of 1878 state:

"The question of allowing persons to take rock from around

the public square, north, was presented; the same was allowed, providing a wall four feet is left around said public square." . . . . "The council decided to move from its present office over the post office, and to pay Joseph Page $2.50 a month." . . . . "The marshal said by representation of a prisoner to sickness at night, he wished council concerning allowing one of the police to sleep with said prisoner, also to labor of said prisoner, and as to where he should take his meals. Council sanctioned that some one sleep with the prisoner. There being no ordinance as to labor of pris¬oners, this cannot be enforced. That the prisoner take his meals in jail." . . . . . "Question of granting license for the sale of liquor, the council unanimously expressed themselves not in favor of li¬censing the sale, if it could possibly be avoided, but it seemed impossible to stop sale, and thought under present circumstances they had better license than do worse." . . . . . "On motion of Peter Monsen, agreed to fence the lockup with lumber twelve feet high."

A twelve foot high lumber fence was placed around the lockup. The lockup referred to was the one built the year previous, and was a rock building, built on the north public square or north fort. Few claim they ever saw the inside of this lockup, but many do remember a prisoner, who in the early hours of the morning, would sit upon the roof of the building and sing the popular songs of the day. This, however, was after the high board fence had been placed around it.

The story is told that prior to this, a policeman, and by the way there were many, after locking up a prisoner, when turning a corner on Main Street, came face to face with the prisoner.



p 155 HML

Saturday, February 19, 2011

GOULASH

1 small package of macaroni
1 pound hamburger
1 can kidney beans
1  quart tomatoes
1 large chopped onion
2 tablespoons sugar

Cook macaroni and drain

Cook meat and onions.
Add beans, tomatoes, and cooked macaroni;
salt and pepper to taste.

Simmer a little while and serve

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

Isaac Allred Was Murdered

The First Murder


On the 11th day of May, 1859, on the south side of the street of what is now known as Main, between State and First West, a certain Thomas Ivie, assaulted with a fire brand, Isaac Allred, a church veteran and also a member of Zion's Camp, breaking Allred's skull, and inflicting other injuries upon him, causing his death the following day. The dispute had resulted from a quarrel over the difference of a small herd bill. On the 12th day of May, Thomas Ivie was arrested and taken to Manti, where he was bound over by Justice Elisher Averett. On the 13th of June, a grand jury was impaneled which on the 14th presented a true bill for murder against Ivie. A trial jury was then chosen and the case proceeded; the trial lasted until the 16th when it was admitted to the jury, who returned a verdict of guilty, and on Friday, June 17th, Judge Garner Snow pronounced a sentence of death upon the prisoner. Ivie appealed his case to be tried be¬fore Judge Eccles, and on the 3rd of July, Sheriff A. Tuttle left Manti with the prisoner for Camp Floyd. Ivie was kept at Camp Floyd for sometime, then turned loose. He went to Missouri, where he quarreled with a brother-in-law, who killed him and left his body in a corn field to be devoured by the buzzards. This happened about a year after he left Utah. Isaac Allred was buried in Ephraim. 
  page 44  History of Mt. Pleasant by Hilda Madsen Longsdorf

Monday, February 14, 2011

Sunday, February 13, 2011

Mt. Pleasant Celebrates Valentine's Day

Every February, across the country, candy, flowers, and valentine cards are exchanged between loved ones, all in the name of St. Valentine.
The Mt. Pleasant Relic Home features many artifacts preserved to help future generations appreciate and become more knowledgeable of old-time traditions and crafts. Two examples of the familiar valentine are given here, using separate techniques but with the common medium of paper.

The following picture is a valentine made in 1820 and brought to Utah with one of the original pioneers, Mrs. Marie Clemenson. It was given to her mother in 1820 and no doubt was a treasured keepsake which crossed the plains with Mrs. Clemenson to Utah. It is an excellent example of the art of paper pricking. Paper pricking is the art of piercing holes in paper with a needle. Paper pricking is one of those old-time crafts that have largely been set aside in favor of more modernized crafts.
The actual valentine was too large to scan and so the following is only a portion. The words are in the Danish Language.

Another papercraft became a life time hobby of one of the daughters of another original pioneer. Clarissa Wilcox Meiling, born in Mt. Pleasant in 1863, created thousands of hand-made, hand-cut valentines and sent them to notable figures such as Governor Maw, Governor Lee, President Grant and President George Albert Smith. As you visit museums and libraries in Utah as well as New York, Los Angeles, Canada, you will recognize her hand-cut intricate beauties. The following picture is one of Clarissa's Valentines that Pauline Seely donated to the Mt. Pleasant Daughters of Utah Pioneers. They later donated it to our Relic Home.

In February of 1950, the Provo Herald honored her with an article and her picture as she fashioned one of the old style valentines.

Among her collection was an intricate hand cut valentine which she made when she was 17 years old for her sweetheart, who later became her husband. It was bordered with a braid of her own black hair and tied with faded blue ribbons. Her special sentiment read:
"I cut my own valentine,
and weave it with my hair --
with my own hands I pen these lines,
and send them to thee with care.
My hair hangs down in ringlets,
my eyes as black as slors,
and my heart lies in your bosom
when you are gone afar."

The International Daughters of Utah Pioneers honors Clarissa Wilcox Meiling in their lesson book this month of February with her story and pictures of her craft. We are proud to honor her as one of Mt. Pleasant's own.
These two examples of handcrafted valentines can be seen at the Mt. Pleasant Relic Home. Also included in our collection are an assortment of victorian-era valentines which are ever popular and many are hand-crafted as well.

Daniel Rasmussen ~ Mayor of the Month ~ February 2011

Add caption

Saturday, February 12, 2011

TRY GOOGLE CHROME

YESTERDAY, I SWITCHED OVER TO GOOGLE CHROME AS MY PREFERRED BROWSER.  IT'S FREE, ITS FAST.  SO IF YOU ARE ALSO EXPERIENCING SLOW DOWNLOADS, TRY GOOGLE CHROME !!!  KATHY

Friday, February 11, 2011

Drowning of Little Girl ~ Pearl Virginia Barton ~ December 8, 1915

Washday at John K. Madsen's ~ taken from "Nickels From a Sheep's Back" by Pearle M. Olsen

Monday washday was traditional, and an all-day undertaking.  The reservoir attached to the right side of the wood-burning kitchen stove (Monarch) had to be filled with water carried from the green hydrant.  If John K. was at home, he filled it -- or his brothers did so if they were around.  But sometimes it became a woman's full responsibility, and she enlisted help from the children.

A hot, early morning fire in the stove heated the reservoir water that was then dipped into the hand propelled washer.  A huge oval boiler was set over the front part of the stove and also filled with water from the hydrant.  When the water was hot, a certain amount of lye and ammonia were added to bleach the white clothing and linens as they boiled steadily away.  Then every item was lifted with a smooth stick for transferring to a tub, or the washer.  The stick was usually an old pitchfork or broom handle.

Sorted clothing, tubful by tubful was turned in the old wooden washer allowing each load a given length of time.  Young arms were well suited to perform the back and forth motions (or the later around and around motions) monotonously and endlessly, while grownups lifted and handled the water and clothing from washer to boiler, and tubs.  The articles finally went into a large, round, galvanized tub standing on a wooden bench,.  Every piece was rinsed up and down.  over and over and under in the water entirely by hand.

Each article was then fed through a hand-turned wringer made of two large rubber cylinders of horizontal position, turning in opposite directions while they squeezed water from the cloth.  After the squeezing, the items fell into another large, round tub of water in which bluing had been dissolved.  From dish towels to bed sheets , each piece was dunked up and down a sufficient number of times to be free of all soap particles.  Certain cotton clothing went into a starch bath after that.

When all were wrung as dry as possible, each article was shaken and piled with others in a reed clothes basket and carried to a clothesline onto which they were clipped with wooden clothes pins.  The entire process was a work of art and Virginia (John K. Madsen's wife) was always thrilled with her clothesline, even though was day was heavy and exhausting.

Soap powders and detergents were unknown.  Bars of Fels Naptha soap -- shaped much like small bricks -- were chipped and sliced, then boiled in water to dissolve the chips into a thick syrupy substance that was poured in the washer or boiler as needed.  Homemade soap bars were treated in much the same way if folks were fortunate enough to have some of them, for they were rated as being superior.

Homemade soap was made of animal fat or tallow that was rendered in a tub over a camp-type fire, then boiled with lye and other ingredients.  After boiling down to thick consistency, the mixture was poured into another tub to a depth of four or five inches and allowed to cool.  When somewhat dried and hardened it was cut into large cubes; and when solid enough to be handled each piece was lifted onto paper and left to age -- usually in an attic.


Wednesday, February 9, 2011

Beverly Anderson Olsen Passes Away

Beverly is the lady to thank for the Relief Society Minutes that we post here. 
She regularly attended Pioneer Day.  She was a long-time member of the Mt. Pleasant First Ward.
We honor her memory and her goodness.

Timed By A Big Ben Watch ~ Pearle M. Olsen ~ Her memories of Hugh Barton

On a high load of hay
 Looking like a giant mushroom
Hugh often hunched beside his father
As their hay team strained in harness, to tug
A creaking wagon in slow motion.
Long-sleeved shirts and faded bib overalls
Sheathed both men to wrists and ankles,
A looped leather chain tied a palm-sized watch
to Hugh's breast pocket, and wide
Straw hats cast their island of shade.

Hugh, trained well in the ways of soil men
As they labored their sweating days.
Moon signs told the time for planting seeds,
And their early harvests set a local record.
They lived on the yield of their land:
A grass-mounded root cellar, a few cows,
Lambs, and pigs, with nestings
 Of a dozen chickens -- and flour
Millmade from their own wheat
Provided a full provender.

Their design of days repeated, unerringly,
With Hugh drawing his old watch
From a bulging pocket at regular intervals
As seasons paced their cycles.
Neighbors became anxious about Hugh
When left in his fifty-fifth year.
But a dying father had marketed his farm
To provide annuities for the son,
Deprived of a normal life
 By a blighting childhood disease.

Time-worn patterns still prevail
As Hugh wields his worn and weakened hoe.
He calls daily at the post office,
And sees new shows at the cinema.
Sundays find him in the same chapel seat,
And loyally he trudges to the cemetery,
A traditional bread and milk supper,
Topped by a drugstore ice-cream sundae
Ends each near-automated day
Timed by a Big-Ben watch.

Tuesday, February 8, 2011

Repost: Louise Nelson Peterson (left) and Hilda Dehlin Peterson (right)


There have been many of you interested in the Dehlin Family. Here is a photo I found late last night. I know that Hilda was married to Canute Peterson. I am not sure about Louise.
On the back of the photo it says: donated by Andrew Rolph.



Comment and Correction from Vicki aka Jake:  February 8, 2011
I see this post is almost two years old, but feel I need to let you know..
Louise is my great grandmother. Her maiden name was Nelson, not Dehlin. She was the second wife of Peter C Peterson.




From Our Photo Archives ~ Emma Dewy Allred


 History wanted


Saturday, February 5, 2011

Black Hawk Indian War Muster Roll April 1866


Look for your ancestor. 

We have been asked to post these rolls as there is a lot of interest in the pioneers who participated in the Black Hawk Indian War.  This particular roll may not have been the first.  We will continue to publish these rolls as time permits.  Also, We are posting only the Mt. Pleasant entries.  Those who want the names from other communities can email me at pandk@cut.net

Remember, you can click on them to enlarge them.

Enjoy !!!  Kathy Hafen

Anna Sorenson Smith Obituary ~ 1991

Friday, February 4, 2011

Thalmann Family Photos ~ shared by Deena Sutton

Lucetta Thalmann Farnworth

Ferry and Rhoda Thalmann

Olive and Ray Thalmann

 
Lucetta Thalmann



 

Rhoda Thalmann


Robert Thalmann


Robert Thalmann

Genealogy Quote



"In all of us there is a hunger, marrow-deep, to know our heritage - to know who we are and where we have come from."



~Alex Haley




L.D.S. Temple

L.D.S. Temple
Manti Temple