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Wednesday, November 11, 2015

National Poppy Day

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Not to be confused with Remembrance Sunday.
Remembrance Day
Cenotaph London.jpg
The Cenotaph at Whitehall, London on Remembrance Day 2004
Official nameRemembrance Day
Also calledPoppy Day
Observed byCommonwealth of Nations(except Mozambique)
TypeInternational
SignificanceCommemorates Commonwealth war dead
ObservancesParadessilences
Date11 November
Next time11 November 2015
Frequencyannual
Related toArmistice DayVeterans Day,Memorial DayAnzac Day
Remembrance Day(also known as Poppy Day) is a memorial day observed inCommonwealth of Nations member states since the end of theFirst World War to remember the members of their armed forces who have died in the line of duty. The day, specifically designated by King George V on 7 November 1919,[1] or alternative dates, is also recognised as special days for war remembrances in many non-Commonwealth countries. Remembrance Day is observed on 11 November to recall the end of hostilities of World War I on that date in 1918. Hostilities formally ended "at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month", in accordance with the armistice signed by representatives of Germany and the Entente between 5:12 and 5:20 that morning. ("At the 11th hour" refers to the passing of the 11th hour, or 11:00 am.) The First World War officially ended with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles on 28 June 1919.[2]
The memorial evolved out of Armistice Day, which continues to be marked on the same date. The initial Armistice Day was observed atBuckingham Palace, commencing with King George V hosting a "Banquet in Honour of the President of the French Republic"[3]during the evening hours of 10 November 1919. The first official Armistice Day was subsequently held on the grounds of Buckingham Palace the following morning.
The red remembrance poppy has become a familiar emblem of Remembrance Day due to the poem In Flanders Fields. These poppies bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flandersin World War I; their brilliant red colour became a symbol for the blood spilled in the war.

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