Relic Home and Blacksmith Shop

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

When Did Girls Stop Wearing Dresses TO School?








The following is taken from Wikipedia:
Since the adoption of trousers in Western Europe in Late Antiquity, trousers have been largely worn by men and not by women until the early 20th century.


In 1919, Luisa Capetillo challenged the mainstream society by becoming the first woman in Puerto Rico to wear trousers in public. Capetillo was sent to jail for what was then considered to be a "crime", but the judge later dropped the charges against her.

Women increasingly wore trousers as leisurewear in the 1920s and 30s. In the early 20th century female pilots and other working women often wore trousers. Actresses Marlene Dietrich and Katharine Hepburn were often photographed in trousers from the 1930s. During World War II, women working in industrial work in war service wore their husbands' (suitably altered) trousers, and in the post-war era trousers were still common casual wear for gardening, socialising, and other leisure pursuits.

Similarly, in Britain during the Second World War, because of the rationing of clothing, many women took to wearing their husbands' civilian clothes to work while their husbands were away in the armed forces. This was partly because they were seen as work garments, and partly to allow women to keep their clothing allowance for other uses. As the men's clothes wore out, replacements were needed, so that by the summer of 1944 it was reported that sales of women's trousers were five times more than in the previous year.[1]

In the 1960s, André Courrèges introduced jeans for women, leading to the era of designer jeans.

In 1969 Rep. Charlotte Reid (R-Ill.) became the first woman to wear trousers in the U.S. Congress.[2]

Pat Nixon was the first American First Lady to wear trousers in public.[3]



1967-68 ~ Still in Dresses.

For a period in the 1970s, trousers became quite fashionable for women. In the United States, this may be due to the passage of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which declared that dresses could not be required of girls. Dress codes thus changed in public schools across the United States.


In 1989 California state senator Rebecca Morgan became the first woman to wear trousers in a U.S. state senate.[4]


 

 Hillary  is the first, and still the only, first lady to ever wear a pant-suit, or even pants for that matter, in the traditional first lady portrait. 




Women were not allowed to wear trousers on the U.S. Senate floor until 1993.[6][7] In 1993, Senators Barbara Mikulski and Carol Moseley Braun wore trousers onto the floor in defiance of the rule, and female support staff followed soon after, with the rule being amended later that year by Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Martha Pope to allow women to wear trousers on the floor so long as they also wore a jacket.[6][7]


Since 2004 the International Skating Union has allowed women to wear trousers instead of skirts in competition if they wish.[8]


In 2012 the Royal Canadian Mounted Police began to allow women to wear trousers and boots with all their formal uniforms.[9]


Until 2016 some female crew members on British Airways were required to wear British Airways’ standard "ambassador" uniform, which has not traditionally included trousers.[10]


Since the adoption of trousers in Western Europe in Late Antiquity, trousers have been largely worn by men and not by women until the early 20th century.

In 1919, Luisa Capetillo challenged the mainstream society by becoming the first woman in Puerto Rico to wear trousers in public. Capetillo was sent to jail for what was then considered to be a "crime", but the judge later dropped the charges against her.



Women increasingly wore trousers as leisurewear in the 1920s and 30s. In the early 20th century female pilots and other working women often wore trousers. Actresses Marlene Dietrich and Katharine Hepburn were often photographed in trousers from the 1930s. During World War II, women working in industrial work in war service wore their husbands' (suitably altered) trousers, and in the post-war era trousers were still common casual wear for gardening, socialising, and other leisure pursuits.


Similarly, in Britain during the Second World War, because of the rationing of clothing, many women took to wearing their husbands' civilian clothes to work while their husbands were away in the armed forces. This was partly because they were seen as work garments, and partly to allow women to keep their clothing allowance for other uses. As the men's clothes wore out, replacements were needed, so that by the summer of 1944 it was reported that sales of women's trousers were five times more than in the previous year.[1]


In the 1960s, André Courrèges introduced jeans for women, leading to the era of designer jeans.


In 1969 Rep. Charlotte Reid (R-Ill.) became the first woman to wear trousers in the U.S. Congress.[2]


Pat Nixon was the first American First Lady to wear trousers in public.[3]


For a period in the 1970s, trousers became quite fashionable for women. In the United States, this may be due to the passage of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which declared that dresses could not be required of girls. Dress codes thus changed in public schools across the United States.


In 1989 California state senator Rebecca Morgan became the first woman to wear trousers in a U.S. state senate.[4]


Hillary Clinton was the first woman to wear trousers in an official U.S. First Lady portrait.[5]


Women were not allowed to wear trousers on the U.S. Senate floor until 1993.[6][7] In 1993, Senators Barbara Mikulski and Carol Moseley Braun wore trousers onto the floor in defiance of the rule, and female support staff followed soon after, with the rule being amended later that year by Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Martha Pope to allow women to wear trousers on the floor so long as they also wore a jacket.[6][7]


Since 2004 the International Skating Union has allowed women to wear trousers instead of skirts in competition if they wish.[8]


In 2012 the Royal Canadian Mounted Police began to allow women to wear trousers and boots with all their formal uniforms.[9]


Until 2016 some female crew members on British Airways were required to wear British Airways’ standard "ambassador" uniform, which has not traditionally included trousers.[10]

lthough the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was written in order to end discrimination in various fields based on sex, religion, race, color, or national origin, in the area of employment,[1] the 1964 Act did not include any prohibition on gender discrimination in public education and federally assisted programs[2] but it did energize the women's rights movement, which had somewhat slowed after women's suffrage in 1920.[3]While Title IX is best known for its impact on high school and collegiate athletics, the original statute made no explicit mention of sports.[4]


In 1967, President Lyndon Johnson sent a series of executive orders in order to make some clarifications. Before these clarifications were made, the National Organization for Women (NOW) persuaded President Johnson to include women in his executive orders.[3] Most notable is Executive Order 11375, which required all entities receiving federal contracts to end discrimination on the basis of sex in hiring and employment.




North Sanpete 1964




Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 declared that dresses could not be required of girls. Dress codes thus changed in public schools across the United States.


Women were not allowed to wear trousers on the U.S. Senate floor until 1993. In 1993, Senators Barbara Mikulski and Carol Moseley Braun wore trousers onto the floor in defiance of the rule, and female support staff followed soon after, with the rule being amended later that year by Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Martha Pope to allow women to wear pants on the floor so long as they also wore a jacket.[6][7]


In California, Government Code Section 12947.5 (part of the California Fair Employment and Housing Act) expressly protects the right to wear pants (American English for trousers).[25] Thus, the standard FEHA discrimination complaint form includes an option for "denied the right to wear pants." [26]




North Sanpete1984

2 comments:

lee r christensen said...

Great Post. And when did boys stop wearing bib overalls>?

Kathy Hafen said...

That is yet to come.

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