Thursday, September 1, 2011

Lund ~ Pioneers of the Month ~ September 2011

What is in a name?

LUND






Sheldon R. Murphy [Son of Bert Lund Murphy]
June 30, 2011
What is in a name? LUND
Until the late nineteenth century, patronymic naming conventions were common in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Wales, and a number of other countries. Patronymic names were the only names used in Denmark from Viking days until 1828, when it was banned by law.


By way of explanation, patronymic naming is the practice of creating last names from the name of one's father. For example, Robert, John's son, would become Robert Johnson. Robert Johnson's son Neil would become Neil Robertson. Patronymic names are a problem for genealogists; tracking a family tree is most difficult when the surnames change every generation. Daughters followed a similar pattern, ie. Robert Johnson's daughter Anna would become Anna Robertdatter.


The reason for the law was simple: public authorities were having difficulties tracking people. The 1828 law simply froze the process, dictating that new generations would keep the patronymic of the head of the family at that time. It took some time before the law was fully adhered to. The unfortunate result was that two thirds of Danes still carry a limited selection of names such as Nielsen, Jensen, and Hansen. So why not choose a completely separate name from Nielsen? They choose the name of Lund.


The name LUND, in Danish means ‘a grove of trees’. It is also the name of a famous town at the tip of Sweden [in the province of Skane - formerly owned by Denmark – write-up is attached].  The work of conversion to The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-saints among the Danish was quite successful. In total about 17,000 Danes, second only to England, accepted the Gospel message and emigrated to Zion. The northern area of Denmark, Jutland county, was productive, as well as, Vejle, Ribe and Aarhus counties.


Lund is a short word, easy to pronounce, is distinctive and uncommon as a surname. Niels Lauridsen Lund and siblings were the first in our family to use this name as a ‘surname’. His father name was Laurids Nielson, which in Denmark would suggest the son be called Niels Lauridsen. See below.  He used these as first and middle name, with the LUND was added.
We don’t know Niels began using the Lund surname. Probably when Niels was born in 1841. Records show that all the children of Laurids and Frederikke did the same. His parents, Laurids Nielson and Frederikke Jensen were baptized into The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 21 June 1857, while Niels was baptized on 16 May 1859 at age 18. 

The records show Laurids Nielson and Frederikke Jensen’s other children were: the oldest, Jens, Kristine Marie (died as an infant), and Soren, Christian, Hans and Peter were baptized when converted or came of age. When Niels served as a missionary in 1860? in Denmark for the Church, he was known as Elder Lund. See attachment.


A reading of Christian Lund’s excellent journal poignantly discusses these important events. I will draw heavily on it, “Autobiography of Christian N. Lund”, in the following notes, as it was the only material I have found yet on our Lund ancestors    [ BYU Ref. Desk, Call # - BX8670.1.L973].
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Niels Lauridsen Lund, our great grandfather, was born in 1841 in Seest, Denmark.  completed a mission there in 1864. He then emigrated to the USA and traveled across the plains to SLC with the Soren Christofferson Wagon Train, perhaps leaving in early August of 1864. They arrived in SLC on 13 Oct 1864.
He remarked in his trek notes ‘The Journey Across the Plains’ by  Niels Lauritzen (sp) Lund – Age 23.


 “I shall not go into detail describing the journey across the plains. Many have written about the covered wagon and hardships of the journey, and as there was such great similarity in them all, I shall only mention a few special incidents.


At night the wagons would all be put in a circle so as to make a corral, or pen, to hold the oxen in. In this circle fires were built and here the cooking was done. One morning, after the oxen had been caught and yoked up and many teams had been hitched to the wagons, either buffalo, Indians, or something else, frightened the oxen so that they stampeded, upsetting wagons, breaking wagon tongues and hurting a few people. I was eating bread and milk, and I lost my spoon, a good new silver one.


The next mishap was in crossing one of the large rivers where the people had to wade to decrease the load on the wagons. Even then many of the wagons were very heavily loaded, and got "hung up" on the bank, so several extra teams had to be put on to pull them out.
On one of these hard pulls, a father's best ox, a very "high-lifed" one, "burst" something inside, and died in a short time. This made it necessary for the father to buy another ox.

From then on, all went as usual on such journeys until we crossed the line into Utah, when the youngest child, a boy named Israel [Israelsen], died, fulfilling that father's dream to the letter; namely: "That he had arrived in Zion and was gathering up his family and found all but one. " The child was buried by the road side. The exact place of the grave is not known. After arriving in Salt Lake City, we stayed there a short time to rest.” 


Niels Lauridsen Lund having completed his mission in Denmark emigrated to the USA.  He continued correspondence to friends and converts in Denmark, particularly the Christensens. Elder Lund had served as a missionary leader to the 17 year old missionary, Elder Jens Moller Christensen.  Niels become acquainted also with Jen’s older sister, Johanne Cathrine Christensen. No doubt he encouraged them to make the voyage.
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Jens Moller Christiansen was baptized 31 May 1863 and a sister, Katrine, 3 years younger was also. He then served a 3 ½ year mission in his home country - Denmark. His older sister, Johanne Cathrine Christensen, was baptized 21 Feb 1866. They felt the call to Zion. Gathering their resources, they booked on the first steamship across the Atlantic from Europe, leaving Liverpool on 21 June 1867. The trip was a speedy 13 days. Jens was attracted to, fell in love with and married Ane Kjestine Zachariesen, a young convert, aboard ship. They arrived in NYC on the 4 July 1867, amid the celebration of the event: bands playing, singing, rockets flying and aerial fireworks. They must have thought: What a welcoming!! See story of Jens Moller.
They traveled by river steamer up the Hudson River, by train to Chicago and all the way to North Platt City, NE. Instead of the original 1300 miles, their trek was now only 700 miles to SLC.
They joined a large group, 600 to 700 persons, under to direction of Leonard G. Rich. The group left August 8 and arrived in SLC October 5, 1867. The company was the first large independent company of converts to come to Utah. Brigham Young, Jr. was with the company, returning from his mission to England; His brother, Joseph A. Young, and wife came to North Platte to meet him.
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Perhaps, Niels met Jens and Johanne in SLC for Oct. Conference, where friendships were renewed. Within 8 months their love flourished more and Johanne Cathrine Christensen and Niels Lauridsen Lund were married on 30 May 1868 in the SLC Endowment House and settled in Mt. Pleasant, in southern UT. Later, Christian Nielsen Lund [Niel’s 5 year younger brother] and bride, Petra Antonie Marie Jensen joined them. With ground breaking for the Manti Temple in 1877, ample temple work opportunities were provided for the Lund families. It was dedicated in May, 1888, 11 years in construction. Note: Christian headed the Scandinavian Mission in the late 1890s.
We know somewhat of the poor conditions they lived under: doing hard manual work, one room houses without windows, dirt floors, etc. Their circumstances gradually improved. Niels and Johanne spent their entire lives in Mt. Pleasant, UT and raised their family.  There our grandmother, Camilla, was born and raised – one of nine children.
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We are not aware that Christen Andersen and Anna Margarthe Jensen Moller [Jens and Johanne parents] ever softened their hearts and were baptized or if any of the remaining seven children were. We suspect not, as Jens in his journal stated that the 3 ½ years on his mission he had received no support from home.
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INSIGHTS IN THE EARLY LIFE OF NIELS LAURIDSEN LUND [From the AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF CHRISTIAN N. LUND – A BROTHER]
In a little straw thatched dwelling by the roadside, going from "Seest", Kolding, Denmark to "Hjarup", on the opposite side of the road, where the avenue leads up to "Virkelyst", I first saw the light of day on January 15th 1841.


On a fine Spring morning in the year 1847 I started to the Village School (known as "Seest Vestre Skole"), as was customary my Mother accom­panied me to give me an introduction to my teacher. Our Schoolhouse was about 2 1/2 miles distant, and I thought I had taken quite a journey and seen the world.


My first teacher was a man, a drinking and profane man, after him a man who was sort of a "monk". They were all poor teachers, but experts in using the ‘ratan’ or rod. The fact that I mastered my lessons easily, saved me from many stripes that fell on the backs of those unfortunates, who were rather slow in conception, thus I struggled along until I was 13 years old. We then got a new teacher, a young man fresh from college, of fine attainments, and of a kind and noble disposition, under his instruction I made rapid advancement. His patient efforts, and interest in me, I owe much, as what education I received has been very useful to me. Especially as I have not been very well fitted for hard and heavy work, hence I have a thousand times been thankful for what education I had and have tried to make the best use of it I could.


For the last two years I was at the head of the [class] at School and received many tokens of my teachers approbation. My teacher desired to advance me beyond a common school education, and he proposed to my Parents to get me a place me, free of charge, in the College where he had been trained where I should have taken a three years course. But, my Parents were then members of the Church [baptized June 21, 1857] and looked forward to sometime to emigrate to Utah, so the offer was not accepted. Their main reason was, however, that they had good reason to fear that if I should get into college I would get under other influences. We would have among other things to study, and be instructed in the State religion, the "Lutheran", and that I would be led away from the truth, which I had also already embraced myself.


From my eleventh year I was hired out in the summer to take care of cattle. My first service of that kind was by Laus Jensen in Seest, where I was to stay and do what service I could for 6 months for the sum of 3 Rigsdaler or about $2.50. If I proved a good boy, I was to have a pair of wooden shoes in the bargain. This was in the summer of 1857.  I spoke first time in a meeting (Apr 11 1858 in Holding).  After that in 1858, in 1859 and in 1860. I stayed with Anders Jeppeson, Seest Mark, good people They were kind and good to me. Their daughter "Larsine" and I went to School and to the Lutheran priest and were confirmed together...
Nov 1st 1861 I changed place and moved to one Jacob Simmonsen in the same neighborhood. Here I fared better; he was a kind man and treated me well. My desire for reading was early developed and while here, I often studied, while my companions slept. This man tried very hard to turn me away from the Gospel, thinking, as that was his duty. He told me that the minister who confirmed him had given him the commission that he should be to the blind a "guide" and to the wayfaring or erring "a light".


On Nov: 1st 1862 I moved further south to 'Taaring near "Christiansfalt, Slesvig, to one "Hans K. Dahl" a large land proprietor. Here I was to associate with a large number of rough, and to some extend wicked, people, bad examples of all kind, and an influence tending to evil constantly. So I concluded if I was to stay with the Gospel and the Church I would have to leave that place, or I would be in great danger of being drawn in to the ways of evil and lose the faith. Hence through the aid of my brother Niels, who was now laboring as a missionary I secured a place at Anders Ebbesens paa Sodahl Gaard per Kolding where I moved Nov 1st 1863.


This was a place where several of our people had served and the Gospel was well known. Here I had liberty to attend meetings and for the Missionaries to visit me from time to time and from this on I took more active interest in matters pertaining to the Church.

The Niels Lund's Family Conversion Story:
Our Family was quietly pursuing their humble course in life, satisfied with their lot and not daring to hope for anything better for themselves or their children after them.  Satisfying as best they could the cravings of their spiritual nature by reading the Lutheran prayer book at home and once in a while attending Lutheran Church. A little circumstance transpired which was destined to change the future course of our lives, scatter our family over two continents, and effect our posterity yet unborn.


It was on a pleasant day in the month of April 1857 at our home where I was born. My father was working out. My Mother was alone home with 3 little boys, the smallest being 4 years old, and myself the oldest of the 3, with 9 years.


A man knocked at the door, my Mother bade him come in, having entered, he introduced himself as a Missionary, his name we never knew, as I think only called there the one time. He told to us the wonderful story that God had again revealed himself from Heaven and had raised up a Prophet in America by the name of Joseph Smith. This sounded very, very strange to Mother She said could not understand how that could be true when Bible, as she understood it, stated that if anyone should pretend to have received any new revelation, we should  by no means place any confidence in it, quoting from Paul's Epistle to Galatians 1:8-9. He asked for a Bible and read the quotation, and it proved to read quite differently. He conversed with us for some time explaining further the principles of the Gospel, and the restoration of the Church of Christ upon the Earth, and when he left I remember my Mother said to us boys: "I believe what that man said is true".
The seed was sown which has since born much fruit. But there was a struggle at hand; "Mormonism" was never heard of before in that neighborhood, the people went nearly wild with excitement. Opposition arose from within and without; awful tales were told about the Mormons and about Utah. Courage was necessary to break the ice and be the pioneers in so unpopular a cause. Father hesi­tated and my brothers held back. Mother investigated and reasoned with the Elders. On one occasion when Elder Mads Anderson had come there with full intention to baptize her. They conversed all night, darkness would not lose its hold and the Elder was determined to win the victory, he grew earnest and zealous in his remarks. Speaking rather loud, my Mother remarked that he need not speak so loud, he answered, filled with the spirit of God: "I don't speak harsh to you; I speak to the devil! I want him to leave". He left, and Mother said she was ready to be baptized. They went to where there was water and at the break of day June 21 1857; she was baptized and confirmed a member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints [the father – Laurids Nielsen was baptized after].


At this time I was staying at "Laus Jensen" in Seest, and was then between 11 and 12 years old. Through the influence by which I was surrounded, and from what had been told me about the "Mormons", I was very unfavorable impressed, and felt indignant almost that my Mother should bring this dis­grace upon us.


Although but a boy I had already drank of the influence of evil, and was becoming addicted to swearing and other little vices. A month or so had passed since Mother had been baptized and by that time my Father and my older Brother Jens had followed her example. I thought I would go home and visit them, and give them to understand that I thought they had acted very foolish and brought trouble and disgrace upon their children as well as themselves. I went and I shall never forget that meeting, the picture of my mother on that occasion is yet stamped upon my memory. Clad in simple apparel, I remember yet the patches upon her dress. She appeared a changed woman. There seemed to be a peaceful, gentle and holy influence or expression beaming from her countenance, and when she spoke her words were filled with love and kindness, this overcame me. I could not account for it. I marveled.


This was of course the result of her obedience to the Gospel (and the influence of the Holy Ghost which had been imparted to her. I forgot to give vent to my former feelings of regret for what she had done. My Father was also there and felt happy for what he had received.


On the 1st day of November 1857 [Christian was 11] as I was going home from the place where I had been working during the Summer, I met on the road two of my brothers Soren and Hans. They both believed the Gospel and we had a conversation about it there on the road. Up to this time I had been fully determined that I would not have anything to do with it, but while standing there conversing I felt plainly the spirit of God coming over me, and an impression or testimony came to me that it was right and I ought to obey it.


From that hour I have never opposed it nor doubted its truth. I did not know then what it was, but I felt like the disciples said they did, when Jesus spoke to them by the way "our hearts burned within us". I went home and to the great joy of my Mother, I told her I believed she had done right and that I would soon follow her example.


It was on a cold stormy evening in March 20, 1858 when Elder Hans P. Iverson led me in to the waters of baptism in the same place where Father and Mother had been baptized. I knew but little of the Gospel, at that time, but I felt that I had done the will of the Lord and the spirit of the Lord was given me to that extent that it was an easy matter for me to leave off my bad habits and be a better boy.


A short time after my baptism I dreamt one night that I saw the Savior coming in the clouds of Heaven. I was then standing at the place where I had been baptized, and as I looked at Him I saw Him wave his hand, and the Heavens rolled together like a scroll. This impressed itself upon my mind as a further testimony to me that the Lord approved of what I had done.
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Christian N. Lund's Mission Call:
During the year 1865 I stayed again with A. Ebbesen During the month of Aug. On the 11th 1865 of that year I attended a Meeting in Fredericia, where I was ordained a Teacher by President F 0. Behrman. In Sep following I attended a Conference in Veile. Here I received my first missionary ap­pointment in the Priesthood, to go out as a Missionary in the fall, by Nov, to labor under the direction of Jens Moller Christensen in Horsens Branch.


President Berhman told me afterwards that he had prayed earnestly to the Lord to know who, out of a number of young men, he should call to the ministry, and that the spirit plainly manifested to him what to do in this selection. After I came to reflect upon what a Mission meant, I became momentarily a little fearful lest I should, as some had, done undertake it and fail. But, I resolved to obey the call and go and trust in the Lord. I thank my Heavenly Father that I did, as this was one of the turning points of my life.


On the 1st day of Nov 1865 I bid farewell to A. Ebbesen family where I had been for 2 years, and I went home to my Mother to spend a few days previous to going to start on my Mission. After a few days visit and having received the blessing and good wishes of my Mother, I started on the 7th day of Nov for Veile where I was to report myself on that day for duty. I walked there on foot 16 Miles carrying all my worldly effects in a bundle with me. Here I met Elder F.C. Sorenson and V.F.O. Berhman, the presiding Brethren in the Conference: The Missionaries from the Conference came in and we had a Priesthood Meeting in the evening. Here I was ordained a Priest by P. C. Sorusen and was called upon to bear my testi­mony.


Next morning having received my appointment to labor in Horsens Branch under the direction of "Jens Moller Christensen". I started out with him for Horsens and on the way we visited his Jen Moller's parents and rested there. I met for the first time his sister Johanne Cathrine Christensen, afterwards my brother Niels's wife.
During the winter we labored faithful; we visited nearly every house in the City of Horsens and much of the surrounding country, and added a few to the Church. In the spring I was, as was customary, released to work and earn a little. I labored on the railroad between Veile and Horsens, and in the fall I was called into the mission field again by Bro. Soren Iverson, now the President of the Danish Conference. It had been on September 23rd 1866 that I was ordained an Elder by "Niels Wilhelmsen". On May 1868 I was released with permission to go home to Zion [America].
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While laboring in Horsens I had baptized a family by name Mikkel Jensen, with 7 or 8 children. They were kind enough to loan me the necessary money for my emigration and I stood now at the age of 22 ready to leave my native land and gather with the Saints of God. My heart was filled with gratitude to my Heavenly Father. During the first days of June I visited my parents and bid them goodbye, my Father for the last time, as I never saw him alive anymore.


On the 10th of June 1868, in company with a few others I left Horsen and arrived in Veile about 10 am and at noon, we sailed out of Veilefjord, the woods and hills echoing our songs. We arrived in Copenhagen the next day, and remained here until June 14th and all went on board a steamer for Hull, England. We saw the last points of the shores of my native land fade away in the distance.


0h, the strange reflections when I, from the steamers deck, gazed for the last time on the receding  shores of my native land the land that gave me birth, and where my forefathers for generations past had lived and died, and where I had spent my childhood and youth. Here I stood now at the age of 22, an inexperienced boy, without one of my own relatives, and on my way to a new and far distant country, leaving all the endearments of youth, my parents, brothers and friends. But my trust was in the Lord who had been kind and guided me in the past through temptations and diffi­culties, and blessed me to retain the faith and continue with his people and now opened my way to go to Zion to learn more of his ways.


The Trip Over to America
We arrived in due time in Hull, England and by rail to Liverpool...We were joined by a company of English Saints. On the 19th of June 1868 we went on board the Sailer '"Emerald Isle" and towards evening we glided out of the harbor of Liverpool with about 1000 souls on board. This voyage which lasted 56 days was exceedingly unpleasant: bad water, poor provision, brought sickness and death. We cast overboard 57 children and 4 adults, and many contracted diseases and died during the first few weeks after our landing. Elder Hans Jenson Hals...was our Captain or leader and had done the very best he could for us. Read note at end about ship ‘John Bright’, sailed June 4, 1868.


At the dawn of day on August 11th we beheld for the first time the shores of America. As we sailed into the beautiful harbor of New York where could be seen on either side the lovely villas and mansions on the hillsides peeping through the green foliage, and pleasure steamers crossing and recrossing, we were charmed with the grandeur of the scene.

After having endured a long and very unpleasant voyage I was so overjoyed in seeing land. I went to a secluded place and offered my gratitude to my Heavenly Father for his kind care over us in leading us safely to see the land hallowed by Him to bring forth his work in the latter days.


Arrival in SLC
About 9 o’clock in the morning of Sep. 25 Friday we entered Salt Lake City. On Sunday the 27, I went to the Tabernacle and heard for the first time an Apostle of the Lord preaching the Gospel - John Tay­lor was the Speaker. I wrote a letter to Petra A.M. Jenson a young Sister back in Denmark and asked her to come and be my wife. At Conference Oct 6th, 1868 I had the pleasure of meeting my Brother Niels, who had now been in Utah in 4 years [1884] and also his wife "Johanne Cathrine Christensen" who emigrated the year before…our meet­ing was a pleasant one all around.


Securing a Wife
In the winter I received from Petra A. M. Jenson a favorable reply to my letter of proposal. About the middle of Aug I went to Ogden to meet my girl. I had sent money for her emigration.  We met here and renewed our pledges and I took her to Brigham City. On the 11 day of October 1869 we were married in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City by Apostle Wilford Woodruff. We had concluded to go and settle in Mt. Pleasant. Sanpete County, where my Brother Niels lived.


We started from Salt Lake City the same evening... I shall never forget that trip. I have always called our wedding tour. We walked in the daytime and slept in the open air at night and got something to eat by the way as we could. We reached Nephi UT and stopped there over­night and next day we stopped in Foun­tain Green...we heard Apostle Orson Hyde preach. On Monday Oct 18, we started on foot for Mount Pleasant...we arrived there in the afternoon about 3 or 4 o'clock.


A Sister Mikkelsen showed us where Niels Lund lived close by, where we met his wife and were welcomed. Here we now made our home temporarily. We were now located so far as the Town was concerned, where we were destined to spend the remainder of our lives. All our worldly effects were a small box with a little clothing and a few quilts.


My Brothers folks were kind to us and helped us in every way they could... I took up land in Wales, UT 20 acres and a city lot with full inten­tion to locate, but it seemed I could not get away from Mt Pleasant.  I have always thought since that the Lord wanted me to locate and remain there. I can testify now after many years experience that through all these years, through joy and sorrow, prosperity and adversity His Hand has been over me for good, and when I have sought him he has been near unto me, and when I have been in distress he has heard my cry.
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In 1872 [3 years later] I now built us a better home. It contained but one room, but it was an improvement on what we had. The Fall of 1874 – Christian was granted US Citizenship in the District Court at Provo.
In the fall of this year (1872) my Parents and youngest Brother, Peter. came to Utah. My Father took sick while on the journey and died the 2 Oct 1872 in Salt Lake City, and was buried there. My Mother and Peter came to Mt. Pleasant and lived for a time with my Brother Niels, where Peter died of consumption Nov 14th 1872. My Mother moved and lived in our house until her death, April 27, 1875. She lived not in vain. God bless her memory.


My Brother Hans came over from Germany about Nov 1880 and earned money to send for his girl, Grethe Marie Juhler, who came and stayed with us before they married Christmas 1882. My dear wife of 13 years and mother of my 7 children, Petra, passed away 21 Apr 1882.

 New Romance

Time was rolling on and I felt I could not be alone with my children, and that I ought to fine another companion. I found that a young girl was not inclined to marry a man with five small children, and besides that, poor. I wrote to Bro. Brown, my neighbor, who was on a mission in Denmark, if there was a good sister there whom he would think should make me a good wife, to recommend her to me. He wrote back and sent me a picture of a sister from Odense. After some consideration, I opened correspondence with her which resulted in me sending money for her emigration and she arrived together with Hans Poulson and others in Mt. Pleasant on July 1st 1884 [she was 25]. She came to our house and we became further acquainted and on Oct 9th same year we went to the House of the Lord in Salt Lake City and were there married for Time and Eternity by Daniel H. Wells.

Her name was Anna Nielson, born in "Storby" between Odense and Svendborg Fyen, Denmark on September 22nd 1859. She had lived together with her mother in Odense for some years, where both of them embraced the Gospel, she being baptized Oct 1st 1882 by Elder Morten Rasmuson, son of Mt. Pleasant family.


She is of medium height, blond hair, fair complexion and fine form and blue eyes. She took upon herself the duties of Wife and Mother and I felt thankful to my Heavenly Father that he had given me a good companion to bring comfort and joy to our home.

Death of Daughter Maria Emilie Lund - 1885
“We were all around her bedside Father Mother, Brothers and Sister and bade her our last farewell. We all loved her so much. She was such a smart, thoughtful and good girl. She was but eleven years and nine months old when she died, but she was so matured in her mind and nature, earnest and devoted in all her work at home and in school. I felt that I loved her with all the tenderness of my nature and if I ever caused her pain or sor­row it was not intended.


“The departure of our loved ones teaches us a great lesson, namely to keep and cherish with greater care and love and kindness, those whom God shall permit to remain with us, to bear with their weaknesses as we desire our Heavenly Father to bear with ours, and be if necessary, as the Poet says, "Be to their faults a little blind and to their virtues very kind." This added one more to the Family circle on the other side of the veil, and while we mourn now when they leave us we shall rejoice exceedingly when we shall meet them in their happy home beyond.”


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Niels Lauridsen Lund died 18 Mar 1896. Johanne Cathrine Lund, widow of my brother, Niels, died in SLC on Mar 21, 1890/1910??? - age 66.


Accomplishments of Christian Niels Lund was ordained to preside over 66th Quorum of Seventy, called to Northwestern States Mission, member of County Constitutional Convention, Secretary of United Order, Mayor of Mt. Pleasant, High Priest, Bishop’s councilor, Superintendent of ZCMI, Bishop, State Legislature, Justice of Peace, US Court Commissioner and Judge, Land Commissioner, call to preside over Scandinavian Mission 1896-1898 [Apostle Anthon Lund met him], helped form Snow Academy, Stake President.

The Good Ship ‘John Bright’
On June 4, 1868 the packet ship "John Bright" sailed from Liverpool, England to America, with 722 Saints (176 from Scandinavia), under the direction of James McGaw. McGaw was appointed President of the Company, with C.O. Folkman and F. C. Anderson as his Counselors. While sailing William Henry Bradfield gave the following account of the trip under Captain McGaw;
"We were on the water six weeks, nearly all the time the sea was wild and stormy. One night Captain McGaw told the saints they had to give up the ship; so, if they believed there was a God, they had better ask for help. We children were clinging to Mother’s dress and crying. If ever there were prayers offered up, it was that night, and they were answered! Next day was a beautiful day and we children went on deck where 


We could see the rigging all torn away and the masts cracked."
Mary Ann William Jenkins stated they were only allowed a certain amount of provisions each day. We would fix it the best we could and take it up on the deck to be cooked. We had oatmeal, split peas, bacon out of brine, hard tack, which is great big, flat biscuits as big as saucers and as hard as iron, very few potatoes, brown sugar and a very small portion of flour. The water was in large wooden kegs which got very stale before the end of the journey." They landed in what is now Ellis Island. They were examined by doctors and then put on a steamer and taken to New York harbor. Annie Batt Bird Caffall recalled, the boat was unfit for travel and sank on the return to England.


The company arrived in New York, July 13th. The following day proceeded by railroad westward. The Union Pacific Rail fare from New York to Omaha was $14.00. From Omaha to Laramie, the end of the Railroad, was $35.00, but if you worked for the Railroad it was only $14.00. Here the emigrants met the Church teams. The fare by the Church teams from the railroad to Salt Lake City was $29.00 which the emigrants paid later.
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Father  Niels Lauridsen LUND1






Birth
24 Feb 1841
Seest, Ribe, Denmark
 B: 16 May 1859

Death
18 Mar 1896
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
 E: 30 May 1868

Burial
21 Mar 1896
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
SP: 11 Jun 1908
MANTI

Marriage
30 May 1868
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., UT
SS: 30 May 1868
SLAKE

Father
Laurids NIELSEN (1806-1872)



Mother
Frederikke JENSEN (1814-1875)



Mother  Johanne Cathrine CHRISTENSEN1






Birth
13 Jan 1844
Hornstrup, Vejle, Denmark
 B: 21 Feb 1866

Death
21 Mar 1910
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., UT
 E: 30 May 1868

Burial
24 Mar 1910
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
SP: 9 Oct 1951
SLAKE

Father
Christen ANDERSEN (1809-1884)



Mother
Anna Margrethe Jensen MOLLER (1817-1865)




Children




M
Niels Lauridsen LUND1






Birth
15 Feb 1869
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
 B: 7 Sep 1878

Death
9 Nov 1937

 E: 28 Jan 1891

Burial


SP: BIC

Spouse
Annie Elizabeth CARLSEN (1871-    )

SS: 28 Jan 1891


Marriage
28 Jan 1891












F
Frederikke Julia LUND twin1






Birth
6 Sep 1870
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
 B: 7 Sep 1878

Death
16 Jul 1898

 E: 27 Nov 1895

Burial


SP: BIC

Spouse
Severin SWENSEN (1870-    )

SS: 27 Nov 1895
MANTI

Marriage
27 Nov 1895
Manti, Sanpete Co., UT



F
Johanne Cathrine LUND twin1






Birth
6 Sep 1870
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
 B: 9 Sep 1878

Death
9 Jun 1938

 E: 21 Dec 1939

Burial


SP: BIC

Spouse
Thomas NEWMAN (1865-1936)

SS:

M
Peter Christian LUND1






Birth
2 Nov 1872
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
 B: 21 May 1881

Death
30 Oct 1937
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., UT
 E: 28 May 1902

Burial

Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
SP: BIC

Spouse
Zina Romania LARSEN (1877-    )

SS: 28 May 1902


Marriage
28 May 1902




F
Camilla Margaret LUND1






Birth
27 Dec 1874
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
 B: 8 Jul 1883

Death
8 Mar 1952
Burley, Cassia Co., ID
 E: 12 Apr 1899
SLAKE

Burial
12 Mar 1952
Burley, Cassia Co., ID
SP: BIC

Spouse
Thomas E. "Ernest" MURPHY (1872-1957)

SS: 12 Apr 1899
SLAKE

Marriage
12 Apr 1899
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., UT



F
Laurene Maria LUND1







Birth
11 Aug 1877
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
 B: 20 Jun 1886

Death
25 Sep 1917
Arco, Butte, Idaho
 E: 16 Jun 1920

Burial
27 Sep 1917
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
SP: BIC

Spouse
Cyrus Andrew JUSTESEN (1877-    )

SS:








Marriage
18 Aug 1899
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., UT











M
Wilford Franklin LUND1






Birth
27 Feb 1881
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
 B: 9 Oct 1889

Death
31 Jul 1960
Elysian Cemetery, SLC, UT, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., UT
 E: 2 May 1936

Burial


SP: BIC

Spouse
Ethel APPLEBY (1890-    )

SS:


Marriage
27 May 1908




Spouse
Edna MCNAMARRA (    -    )

SS:


Marriage
2 May 1936




M
Andrew Parley LUND1






Birth
12 Sep 1882
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
 B: 5 Jul 1891

Death
22 Jul 1898

 E: 13 Sep 1905

Burial


SP: BIC

Spouse
Elsie Cathrine CARLSON (    -    )

SS: 13 Sep 1905













F
Thora Naoma Beatrice LUND1






Birth
1 Dec 1886
Mt. Pleasant, Sanpete Co., UT
 B: 1 Aug 1895

Death
2 Aug 1927

 E: 29 Sep 1939

Burial


SP: BIC

Spouse
Arthur W. WRIGHT (    -    )

SS:


Marriage
1912
Salt Lake City, Salt Lake Co., UT



Spouse
Charles HARRIS (    -    )

SS:


Marriage
Dec 1916






Lund is a city in the province of Skåne, southern Sweden. The town has 76,188 inhabitants in 2005 out of a municipal total of 105,000. It is the seat of Lund Municipality, Skåne County. The city is believed to have been founded around 990, when Skåne belonged to Denmark. It soon became a major Christian center of the Baltic Sea region, at a time when the area was still a frontier area for Christian mission, and within Scandinavia and especially Denmark through the Middle Ages. From 1103 it was the seat of an archbishop. At the center of the city stands the towering Lund Cathedral, built ca 1090-1145.

Lund University, established 1666, is today one of Scandinavia's largest institutions for education and research, with 42,000 students.
                                                
Lund Cathedral


  lAlong with Sigtuna, Lund is the oldest city in present-day Sweden. Lund's origins are unclear. Until recently the town was thought to have been founded around 1020 by either Sweyn I Forkbeard or his son Canute the Great of Denmark The area was then part of the kingdom of Denmark. But, recent archaeological discoveries suggest that the first settlement dated to circa 990, possibly the relocation of settlers at Uppåkra. The Uppåkra settlement dates back to the first century B.C. and its remains are at the present site of the village of Uppåkra. King Sweyn I Forkbeard moved Loda to its present location, a distance of some five kilometres. The new location of Lund, on a hill and across a ford, gave the new site considerable defensive advantages in comparison with Uppåkra, situated on the highest point of a large plain.
The city was made a see in 1048 and united with Dalby in 1060,[7] and in 1103 became the seat of the archbishop for Scandinavia.  It is still, as the diocese of Lund, a diocese in the Church of Sweden.
In 1658, the Scanian lands were ceded by Denmark to Sweden by the Treaty of Roskilde. On December 4, 1676 Lund was defended in the Battle of Lund, one of the bloodiest battles fought in Scandinavia.

A street in the old part of town.
                                               
  Adelgatan Street, Lund
                                                             
Lund Cathedral School  was founded in 1085 by the Danish king Canute the Saint. This is the oldest school in Scandinavia and one of the oldest in Northern Europe. Many prominent people were educated there, among them the actor Max von Sydow and several high-ranking politicians.
Lund University, established in 1666, is Sweden's largest, with 42,000 full or part-time students, although not all live in Lund. The figure includes Lund Institute of Technology, which is to some extent independent of the old university. As late as the 1940s, Lund was a relatively small city with few large-scale industries, covering only about a fourth of the current urban area, and dominated by the cathedral and the university. Since then, the student population has increased about twelvefold; many industrial companies in the chemical, medical or electronics branches and, more recently[within information management, have set up establishments in the city; and the town's population, architecture and energy have been transformed.
Compared with many other Swedish cities, the urban heart of Lund is well preserved. Lund is located in Sweden's largest agricultural district, in the southwest of Scania, less than ten kilometres from the sandy shore of the Öresund Strait [between Sweden and Denmark]. From the top of the Sankt Hans Hill it is possible to see Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark. It is therefore some distance from other Swedish cities, about 250 kilometres to Gothenburg, 600 to Stockholm and about 1200 to Umeå. The city of Malmö, on the other hand, is only about 15 kilometres away.
During the 12th and 13th centuries, when the town was the seat of the archbishop, many churches and monasteries were built. At its peak, Lund had 27 churches, but most of them were demolished as result of the Protestant Reformation in 1536. Several medieval buildings remain, including Lund Cathedral, Liberiet, the restaurant Stäket and parts of the Cathedral School. Timber framing is characteristic of the houses built up to the end of the 19th century, for example the Wickmanska gården.


University Main Building
  

Liberiet 
 Grand Hotel   
  The Cathedral School
 Wickmanska gården
             
                                        
Facade clock at parking garage  
   Lund University Male Voice Choir
                    

The culture in Lund is characterized by the large student population and student traditions. A substantial part of the nightlife is located at student fraternities called 'Nations'.
Lund hosts the largest open-air museum of Scania, Kulturen. It is the second oldest dedicated open-air museum in the world and consists of more than 30 buildings, as well as large collections on Scanian art, crafts. local archaeology and history. The museum was founded in 1892 by Georg Karlin.
Lund has long been a regional centre for classical and church music. In particular, Lund is renowned for its vibrant amateur choir scene, with choirs. Since 2006, Lund has been the host of the biannual Lund International Choral Festival. In more recent decades, Lund has also developed a lively pop and jazz scene. The concluding scenes in Ingmar Bergman's classic film Wild Strawberries were set in, and were shot, in Lund.
Lund is a centre of high tech companies, such as Sony Ericsson and Ericsson Mobile Platforms, and other telecommunication companies. The Lund Institute of Technology has historical connections with the industrial economy. A business park, Ideon, is for high tech companies that have ties to the university.
Other important industries include medical technology (Gambro), pharmaceuticals (Astra Zeneca), biotechnology (Active Biotech, among others), heat exchanger and separator (Alfa Laval), and publishing/library services. Lund is home to the Tetra Pak company, which manufactures and markets paper packaging and equipment for milk, orange juice, etc. all over the world.
O FIM



We are seeking info on Niels Laurids Lund and Johanne Cathrine Christrensen's family. They settled  in Mt. Pleasant in the 1860s and had children: Camilla, Peter, Niels Jr., Beatrice, Laurene, Julia, Christian, Johanne Cathrine, Andrew Parley.  I am a grandson of Camilla Lund.

We know almost nothing about the lives, loves, families of the above children, and DESCENDENTS.  Except for Christian!
Can you help us? Thank you, Sheldon R. Murphy [son of Bert Lund Murphy] - Orem, UT - 801-221-4723






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