Relic Home and Blacksmith Shop

Sunday, February 27, 2011

The "LockUp" 1874 - 1878

The council took into consideration the plausibility of building a city hall and jail. Moved and seconded to build same, at least as far as to finish the basement, or lower rooms this year. . . . . Salt Lake City ordinances were adopted. . . . . David Candland appointed city attorney. . . .  Committee on building city hall reported. . . . . decided for the present to rent a place for a Lockup. . . . . . . December 28th, meeting at six p.m. . . . . . Peter Monsen and Paul Delhi were each fined $2.00 for non attendance in proper time. . . . . . Taxes were remitted for twenty-four people. . . . . A petition for the remittance of taxes of the signers for labor performed in erecting a liberty pole last 24th of July was read and decided that no appropriation should be made for that purpose, nor taxes of signers remitted.



John Waldermar and W. W. Brandon were appointed a com­mittee to rent and furnish a building to be used as a "Lockup." p 149 and 154  "History of Mt. Pleasant"  by Hilda Madsen Longsdorf

A special meeting of the city council was held October 24, 1877, to consider the propriety of building a Lockup, with height enough to admit a general office above, giving room for all city purposes, and thereby save renting and contingent expenses. After some discussion as to finances, etc., Mr. A. H. Bennett presented a bid in three divisions, one for finished Lockup, $275.00, one for Lockup with additional rooms above, $375.00, and one for Lockup with temporary roof for less than $275.00. Council decided that time and necessity for the building and the known honor of the contracting party, no further bids would be asked and the contract was given Mr. -Bennett, agreeable to the con¬tingency that may arise as to finances in the matter of completion.


"The signed contract, with two signers was duly signed and placed on file in recorder Candland's office, . . . . . the building was completed and received by the city. Corporation notes for $250.00 were given to Mr. Bennett who delivered two keys to the mayor who delivered them to the marshal who was instructed to get bedding, etc. Councilor Peter Monsen was authorized to purchase a suitable stove."

During this time, various problems were discussed in the council rooms: clear titles, liquor ordinances, streets, sidewalks, bridges, irrigation rights, constitutionality, licenses, petitions, re-mittances of taxes, and resignations of officers.

p 154 HML
 
Rock Removed from North Fort Wall


The city records of 1878 state:

"The question of allowing persons to take rock from around

the public square, north, was presented; the same was allowed, providing a wall four feet is left around said public square." . . . . "The council decided to move from its present office over the post office, and to pay Joseph Page $2.50 a month." . . . . "The marshal said by representation of a prisoner to sickness at night, he wished council concerning allowing one of the police to sleep with said prisoner, also to labor of said prisoner, and as to where he should take his meals. Council sanctioned that some one sleep with the prisoner. There being no ordinance as to labor of pris¬oners, this cannot be enforced. That the prisoner take his meals in jail." . . . . . "Question of granting license for the sale of liquor, the council unanimously expressed themselves not in favor of li¬censing the sale, if it could possibly be avoided, but it seemed impossible to stop sale, and thought under present circumstances they had better license than do worse." . . . . . "On motion of Peter Monsen, agreed to fence the lockup with lumber twelve feet high."

A twelve foot high lumber fence was placed around the lockup. The lockup referred to was the one built the year previous, and was a rock building, built on the north public square or north fort. Few claim they ever saw the inside of this lockup, but many do remember a prisoner, who in the early hours of the morning, would sit upon the roof of the building and sing the popular songs of the day. This, however, was after the high board fence had been placed around it.

The story is told that prior to this, a policeman, and by the way there were many, after locking up a prisoner, when turning a corner on Main Street, came face to face with the prisoner.


Rock Removed from North Fort Wall


The city records of 1878 state:

"The question of allowing persons to take rock from around

the public square, north, was presented; the same was allowed, providing a wall four feet is left around said public square." . . . . "The council decided to move from its present office over the post office, and to pay Joseph Page $2.50 a month." . . . . "The marshal said by representation of a prisoner to sickness at night, he wished council concerning allowing one of the police to sleep with said prisoner, also to labor of said prisoner, and as to where he should take his meals. Council sanctioned that some one sleep with the prisoner. There being no ordinance as to labor of pris¬oners, this cannot be enforced. That the prisoner take his meals in jail." . . . . . "Question of granting license for the sale of liquor, the council unanimously expressed themselves not in favor of li¬censing the sale, if it could possibly be avoided, but it seemed impossible to stop sale, and thought under present circumstances they had better license than do worse." . . . . . "On motion of Peter Monsen, agreed to fence the lockup with lumber twelve feet high."

A twelve foot high lumber fence was placed around the lockup. The lockup referred to was the one built the year previous, and was a rock building, built on the north public square or north fort. Few claim they ever saw the inside of this lockup, but many do remember a prisoner, who in the early hours of the morning, would sit upon the roof of the building and sing the popular songs of the day. This, however, was after the high board fence had been placed around it.

The story is told that prior to this, a policeman, and by the way there were many, after locking up a prisoner, when turning a corner on Main Street, came face to face with the prisoner.



p 155 HML

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