Relic Home and Blacksmith Shop

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

August Lundberg History Part 1 of 2 ~ Pioneer of the Month ~ November 2011

August Lundberg History  
compiled by Judy Malkiewicz, a great granddaughter 
Born Nov 1, 1846 (Uppsala, Sweden) and Died Oct 7, 1919 (Mt. Pleasant, Utah)
August Lundberg was born November 1, 1846 in Uppsala, Sweden, believed to be the son of Anders Lundberg (1817-1884) and Louisa Lundberg (dates unknown).

(photo restored by David R. Gunderson)


In 1878, August Lundberg at the age of 30 years left Uppsala, Sweden via Liverpool, England and Queenstown, Ireland for America on the ship Nevada, arriving New York City on July 10, 1878.  He was listed as a laborer on the ship rolls and was accompanied by his wife, Sofia Lundberg (age 30), daughter Amanda (age 11, born August 20, 1869 and died August 1, 1929), son Richard (age 8, born 1873 and died 1955), and Oscar (age 4, born October 7, 1875 and died March 11, 1952). They made their way to Fairview, Utah probably via the railroad and stayed there for two years. Initially, August Lundberg set up business as a tinsmith and watchmaker in Mt. Pleasant, Utah.


August Lundberg had three brothers: one a musician (name unknown), one an undertaker (name unknown) and one an engraver (Isak Lundberg). Isak’s son (nephew to August Lundberg), Godfrey Emanuel Lundberg (born May 4, 1879 and died January 8, 1933), engraved the Lord’s Prayer on the head of a pin. There was a write-up in The Spokesman Review, Spokane, Washington on this Lord’s Prayer engraving. The pin was on display in Idaho Falls, Idaho (date unknown). Godfrey E. Lundberg also engraved U.S. on head of a needle.

August Lundberg is listed in the 1880 Census as living in Mt. Pleasant, Utah as a divorced man of 33 years of age.
August Lundberg married for a second time (date unknown, but probably in 1880 or 1881) to Christina Matilda Lundberg (born July 5, 1852 and died August 5, 1896).
They had 4 children together, Jennie Lundberg (married James Waldemar) (born December 8, 1881 and died November 3, 1936), and Edwin (also known as Edward) Lundberg (born January 15, 1886 and died December 14, 1943) and never married, Maple Henning Lundberg (born May 12, 1888 and died July 16, 1934) who married Hazel Anderson Lundberg, and Nancy Lundberg (born January 2, 1891 and died March 3, 1943) who never married.
Christina Matilda Lundberg died August 5, 1896 in Mt. Pleasant, Utah and is buried at the Mt. Pleasant City Cemetery.
At some point, probably circa 1890, August Lundberg went to Salt Lake City, Utah and studied to become a dentist. He is listed in the 1890 census as living in Salt Lake City, Utah.
August Lundberg had a dental office Murray, Utah circa 1890.


In addition, the 1900 Census revealed August Lundberg listed as living in Salt Lake City, Utah with his son Maple Lundberg, age 12 and daughter Nancy Lundberg, age 9. His wife, Christina Matilda Lundberg having died in 1896.  Also in the 1900 Census, Jennie Lundberg (age 24) and Edwin Lundberg (age 14) are listed living together in Mt. Pleasant, Utah.


On June 5, 1902, August Lundberg married for the 3rd time to Sarah Matilda Johnson Lundberg (went by Matilda, born July 29, 1870 and died October 14, 1943) in Salt Lake City, Utah. They had one son together, Roy August Lundberg (born June 16, 1912 and died May 8, 1933 of a brain tumor – he never married).

The Lundberg family must have lived in Murray, Utah at this time because August Lundberg ran for political office as a councilman for the Socialist Party in the fall of 1903.
However, while living in Murray, Utah and working as a dentist, Dr. August Lundberg maintained a branch dental office in Mt. Pleasant, Utah.
Dr. August Lundberg’s dental office in Mt. Pleasant, Utah was on Main Street. In addition, he ran the Pastime Pool Hall in the same building. By 1906, Dr. August Lundberg built a whole block of buildings on Main Street in Mt. Pleasant, Utah known as the “LUNDBERG BLOCK”.




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